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In the C book, it says:

At least the first 31 characters of an internal name are significant. For function names and external variables, the number may be less than 31, because external names may be used by assemblers and loaders over which the language has no control. For external names, the standard guarantees uniqueness only for 6 characters and a single case. Keywords like if, else, int, float, etc., are reserved: you can't use them as variable names. They must be in lower case.

Can someone explain what is "internal name", "external names", "external variables"? It would be better if you can make an example.

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1  
Which "C book"? Is it actually called "ANSI C"? –  asteri Oct 19 '12 at 16:50
    
@Jeff There's a book called "The C Book" - amazon.com/The-Book-Featuring-Standard-Instruction/dp/… I suspect this is what the OP is referring to. –  Reed Copsey Oct 19 '12 at 16:57
    
That's the C89/C90 standard limits; the C99 standard raises those limits (63 significant initial characters in an internal identifier or a macro name ... 31 significant initial characters in an external identifier ...) with some caveats about universal character names in names. The limits are the same for C2011. Note that the C99 standard requires case-sensitivity where the original C89 standard did not. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 19 '12 at 19:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Stroking my white beard and speaking in a sage and pompous voice, I say:

In the olden days, when FORTRAN and COBOL ruled the computing world, the upstart language C had to fit in to existing tool chains. Those tool chains included link-editors (a/k/a linkers, a/k/a loaders) and assemblers that only handled short 6-character symbol (variable and function) names.

C compilers for those tool chains had to pretend that variable and function names were short when they wrote out object files to be consumed by the link-editors. That was the bad news. The good news was that there are plenty of symbols inside C programs that don't need to show up in the object files.

For example, the names of functions ... e.g. "main" and "sqrt" ... need to show up in the object modules, so code from other object modules could use them. So did the names of "extern" style global variables. Those are the external names.

But all the other names in a C program, for example the names of variables in the scope of functions, the names of members of structs, and so forth, didn't have to make it into the object modules. Those are called "internal names."

So, for example, you could have these C variables within a function

 int myFavoriteItem;
 int myFavoriteThing;

and that would be fine. But you could declare them as external variables, like so:

 extern int myFavoriteItem;
 extern int myFavoriteThing;

Some systems would write these names out to the object files as if they were six letters long (because the object files didn't know what to do with longer names). They would then look to the object file as if they had been declared like this.

 extern int myFavo;
 extern int myFavo;

Those would be duplicate declarations. The C compiler was required to catch this kind of thing and throw an error, rather than write a duplicate declaration to an object file. That was a great help to programmers: duplicate declarations in object files generated really obscure link-editor error messages.

The passage you quoted specifies that compilers have to recognize at least 31 characters of an internal name and 6 of an external name. Modern compilers and toolchains no longer have different name-length limitations.

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+1 for answer and actually having a white beard! –  Spevy Oct 19 '12 at 17:10
1  
+1: I remember coding in C for code being called from Fortran...6 characters monocase. It made meaningful names a trifle difficult (especially since there were namespace rules, so all names started 'g', and the internal functions had to start 'gk', and then the next two were reserved for the 'device driver' (so 'gk0p', 'gk1t', etc, leaving a grand total of two letters or digits available to give a meaningful mnemonic!). –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 19 '12 at 19:40
    
For more history: Radix-50 seems like one of the culprits. It might also explain why $ is allowed in symbol names. –  tc. Mar 8 at 16:52
    
The DEC toolchains used RAD50 symbols, for sure. The $ signs in symbols were, in many assemblers, part of automatically generated items to deal with such things as line numbers. –  Ollie Jones Mar 8 at 17:13

"Internal names" are names of identifiers within a function (effectively local variable names).

"External names" would be the names of the other identifiers, including the names of functions and any identifiers declared at global scope or declared with storage class extern.

Basically, anything that needs to be "externally visible" is only guaranteed to have 6 (non case sensitive) unique characters, which is extremely limiting.

In practice, this is no longer an issue. C99 increased these limits, and most modern compilers do away or significantly increase these limits. For example, Visual C++ allows 247 characters for uniqueness in all identifiers (internal or external) when compiling C.

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Scope is irrelevant. The C standard specifies four scopes: function, file, block, and function prototype. None of these are global. The relevant concept is linkage, which can be internal, external, or none. Identifiers at file and block scope can have external linkage (or not). –  Eric Postpischil Oct 19 '12 at 19:09

An external name is an identifier with external linkage. For an identifier to have external linkage it must either be a non-static of file scope or specifically declared "extern". Example:

int global_variable;

int main(void)
{
    int local_variable;
    extern int extern_variable;
    return 0;
}

In the above example, the identifiers global_variable and extern_variable are external names. local_variable is an internal name.

Note that in practice, the amount of significant characters is larger than just 31 and 6. Microsoft's C compiler for example uses 247 significant characters for both internal as well as external names by default. GCC treats all characters of internal names as significant. The significant characters of external names depend on the linker (and on most platforms the same rule applies as with internal names; all characters are significant.)

The ANSI standard simply states the minimum number of significant characters for an implementation to be standard-conformant.

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Scope is irrelevant. The C standard specifies four scopes: function, file, block, and function prototype. None of these are global. The relevant concept is linkage, which can be internal, external, or none. Identifiers at file and block scope can have external linkage (or not). –  Eric Postpischil Oct 19 '12 at 19:09
    
@EricPostpischil Is the description given here wrong? Specifically: "External identifiers (ones declared at global scope or declared with storage class extern)". –  Nikos C. Oct 19 '12 at 19:23
    
Yes, that text is wrong. The authoritative reference for C is the ISO/IEC C standard, not Microsoft. As I noted, there is no global scope. But consider an identifier declared at the largest possible scope, file scope, with static int x;. This identifier has file scope but internal linkage. There is no scope that guarantees external linkage. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 19 '12 at 19:38
    
@EricPostpischil Thanks. I have corrected the answer to make it clear that linkage is what matters, and that scope can have an effect on linkage but is not the decisive factor. –  Nikos C. Oct 19 '12 at 19:48

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