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I have a generic interface

public interface Consumer<E> {
    public void consume(E e);
}

I have a class that consumes two types of objects, so I would like to do something like:

public class TwoTypesConsumer implements Consumer<Tomato>, Consumer<Apple>
{
   public void consume(Tomato t) {  .....  }
   public void consume(Apple a) { ...... }
}

Apparently I can't do that.

I can of course implement the dispatch myself, e.g.

public class TwoTypesConsumer implements Consumer<Object> {
   public void consume(Object o) {
      if (o instanceof Tomato) { ..... }
      else if (o instanceof Apple) { ..... }
      else { throw new IllegalArgumentException(...) }
   }
}

But I am looking for the compile-time type-checking and dispatching solution that generics provide.

The best solution I can think of is to define separate interfaces, e.g.

public interface AppleConsumer {
   public void consume(Apple a);
}

Functionally, this solution is OK, I think. It's just verbose and ugly.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need two generic interfaces of the same basetype? –  kd304 Aug 19 '09 at 8:16
10  
I would love to be able to do this too. Particularly multiple Iterable<T>s. Sigh... –  jjujuma Aug 19 '09 at 9:25
9  
Type erasure strikes again. –  Raman Dec 21 '11 at 7:11
2  
Due to type erasure you can't do that. Keep it two different classes that implements consumer. Makes more small classes but keeps your code generic (Don't use the accepted answer, it breaks the whole concept... you can't treat the TwoTypesConsumer as a consumer, which is BAD). –  Lewis Diamond Nov 8 '13 at 16:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Consider encapsulation:

public class TwoTypesConsumer {
   private TomatoConsumer tomatoConsumer = new TomatoConsumer();
   private AppleConsumer appleConsumer = new AppleConsumer();

   public void consume(Tomato t) { 
       tomatoConsumer.consume(t);
      }

   public void consume(Apple a) { 
      appleConsumer.consume(a);
   }

  public static class TomatoConsumer implements Consumer<Tomato> {
      public void consume(Tomato t) {  .....  }
  }

  public static class AppleConsumer implements Consumer<Apple> {
      public void consume(Apple a) {  .....  }
  }

}

If creating these static inner classes bothers you, you can use anonymous classes:

public class TwoTypesConsumer {

    private Consumer<Tomato> tomatoConsumer = new Consumer<Tomato>() {
        public void consume(Tomato t) {
        }
    };

    private Consumer<Apple> appleConsumer = new Consumer<Apple>() {
        public void consume(Apple a) {
        }
    };

    public void consume(Tomato t) {
        tomatoConsumer.consume(t);
    }

    public void consume(Apple a) {
        appleConsumer.consume(a);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 - This I rather like. –  banjollity Aug 19 '09 at 7:56
1  
somehow that looks tome like code duplication... I encountered the same problem and found no other solution that looks clean. –  bln-tom Jun 9 '11 at 19:42
20  
But TwoTypesConsumer fulfills no contracts, so what's the point? It can't be passed to a method that wants either type of Consumer. The whole idea of a two-type consumer would be that you can give it to a method that wants a tomato consumer as well as a method that wants an apple consumer. Here we have neither. –  Jeff Axelrod Aug 11 '12 at 3:31
    
@JeffAxelrod I would make the inner classes non-static so they have access to the enclosing TwoTypesConsumer instance if necessary, and then you can pass twoTypesConsumer.getAppleConsumer() to a method that wants an apple consumer. Another option would be to add methods similar to addConsumer(Producer<Apple> producer) to TwoTypesConsumer. –  herman Sep 27 '12 at 11:04
    
This doesn't work if you don't have control over the interface (e.g. cxf/rs ExceptionMapper) ... –  vikingsteve Nov 12 '13 at 9:27

Because of type erasure you can't implement the same interface twice (with different type parameters).

share|improve this answer
3  
I can see how it's a problem... the question is then what's the best (most efficient, safe, elegant) way to bypass this problem. –  Daphna Shezaf Aug 19 '09 at 8:59
    
Without going into the business logic, something here 'smells' like the Visitor pattern. –  Shimi Bandiel Aug 19 '09 at 9:27

At least, you can make a small improvement to your implementation of dispatch by doing something like the following:

public class TwoTypesConsumer implements Consumer<Fruit> {

Fruit being an ancestor of Tomato and Apple.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks, but whatever the pros says, I don't regard Tomato as fruit. Unfortunately there's no common base class other than Object. –  Daphna Shezaf Aug 19 '09 at 7:46
    
You can always create a base class called: AppleOrTomato ;) –  Shimi Bandiel Aug 19 '09 at 8:24
1  
Better, add a Fruit that delegates to either Apple or Tomato. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 19 '09 at 16:40
    
@Tom: Unless i'm misunderstanding what you're saying, your suggestion only pushes the problem forward, since, for Fruit to be able to delegate to either Apple or Tomato, Fruit must have a field of a superclass to both Apple and Tomato referring to the object it delegates to. –  Buhb Aug 19 '09 at 18:03
    
This would imply that TwoTypesConsumer can consume any type of Fruit, any currently implemented and any someone may implement in the future. –  Tom Gillen Mar 5 '12 at 11:07

Here's a possible solution based on Steve McLeod's one:

public class TwoTypesConsumer {
   public void consumeTomato(Tomato t) { ... }
   public void consumeApple(Apple a) { ... }

   public Consumer<Tomato> getTomatoConsumer () {
     return new Consumer<Tomato>() {
        public void consume(Tomato t) {
          consumeTomato(t);
        }
   }

   public Consumer<Apple> getAppleConsumer () {
     return new Consumer<Apple>() {
        public void consume(Apple a) {
          consumeApple(t);
        }
   }
}

The implicit requirement of the question was Consumer and Consumer objects that share state. The need for Consumer,Consumer objects comes from other methods that expect these as parameters. I need one class the implement them both in order to share state.

Steve's idea was to use two inner classes, each implementing a different generic type.

This version adds getters for the objects that implement the Consumer interface, which can then be passed to other methods expecting them.

share|improve this answer

just Stumbled upon this. It just happened, that I had the same Problem, but I solved it in a different way: I just created a new Interface like this

public interface TwoTypesConsumer<A,B> extends Consumer<A>{
    public void consume(B b);
}

unfortunately, this is considered as Consumer<A> and NOT as Consumer<B> against all Logic. So you have to create a small Adapter for the second consumer like this inside your class

public class ConsumeHandler implements TwoTypeConsumer<A,B>{

    private final Consumer<B> consumerAdapter = new Consumer<B>(){
        public void consume(B b){
            ConsumeHandler.this.consume(B b);
        }
    };

    public void consume(A a){ //...
    }
    public void conusme(B b){ //...
    }
}

if a Consumer<A> is needed, you can simply pass this, and if Consumer<B> is needed just pass consumerAdapter

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