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I am using a code that looks like:

const int NUMBER_OF_FIELDS = 3;
int fieldIndex = 0;
int values[NUMBER_OF_FIELDS];

void setup()
  {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  }

void loop()
  {
   if(Serial.available())
    {
     char ch = Serial.read();
     if(ch>='0' && ch <= '9')
       {
       values[fieldIndex] = (values[fieldIndex]*10 +(ch-'0'));
       }
      else if (ch == ',')
       {
        if(fieldIndex < NUMBER_OF_FIELDS -1)
        fieldIndex++;
       }
      else 
       {
       Serial.print(fieldIndex+1);
       Serial.println("fields recieved:");
       for (int i = 0; i<=fieldIndex; i++);
         {
         //Serial.println(values[i]);
         //values[i]= 0;
         }
        fieldIndex = 0; 
       } 
    } 
  }

But I am getting an error that says :

name lookup for 'i' changed for new ISO 'for' scoping

I don't think I did anything wrong in the for loop, so why am I getting this error ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have a semicolon after the for so the int i which has the for loop scoping only is not valid outside of the for loop.

You probably meant to do the following.

  for (int i = 0; i<=fieldIndex; i++)     // no semicolon
  {
     Serial.println(values[i]);
     values[i]= 0;
  }
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for (int i = 0; i<=fieldIndex; i++); <-----
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Ah crap! I feel like an idiot now. Thanks man –  EnderWiggins Oct 19 '12 at 18:31
    
dont worry it took me like 5min before i noticed –  Luka Rahne Oct 19 '12 at 18:33

The problems that you have "closed" the for loop with ;

for (int i = 0; i<=fieldIndex; i++); // <-----
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The problem is that your for loop does nothing: the body of the loop ends at the semicolon right after the loop:

for (int i = 0; i<=fieldIndex; i++);
                                   ^ here

That is, if you uncomment the use of i in the block following the loop, you get an error. This used to be legal in some compilers, i.e., the i declared in the for loop was actually declared in the enclosing scope. This changed during standardization (for C++ 1998).

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