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I am trying to find a good alternative to std::string in games. wstring doesn't work properly in Android. So far I just use ushort[] with 0-65535 range(2 bytes per character) and it seems to work fine for 11 languages as bitmap fonts but moving forward I'd like to get a better implementation.

u8"xxxyyy" literal notations aren't supported in VC++ compiler yet, what other options do I have?

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The path of least resistance is probably to just go ahead and put UTF-8 in std::string objects. You will have to write UTF-8 literals using manually-encoded backslash escapes for anything not in the ASCII range, and you won't be able to use locale, but in my experience locale is useless anyway. –  Zack Oct 19 '12 at 19:22
    
I am trying to get a correct UTF8 implementation so it's easier for others to modify the files for import. –  Grapes Oct 19 '12 at 19:25
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Perhaps you should list thing things that are making you seek an alternative to UTF-8 std::stringss. If it's only that u8 isn't supported in VS then you just need workarounds for that issue. –  bames53 Oct 19 '12 at 19:36
    
Why not keep the text in std:string or char[]? Having the content of the strings anywhere in the code is a clear road to nowhere. Have your content/asset/resource system deliver them in binary/UTF8 format. Everytime you find a xxx = "Game Over" in your code a game coder somewhere dies. –  Andreas Oct 19 '12 at 20:00
    
@Zack if you'd make that an answer and not a comment, I'd upvote it. It's the right way to go. –  moswald Oct 19 '12 at 21:15

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The path of least resistance is probably to just go ahead and put UTF-8 in std::string objects. You will have to write UTF-8 literals using manually-encoded backslash escapes for anything not in the ASCII range, and you won't be able to use locale, but in my experience locale is useless anyway. I can't personally vouch for its helpfulness, and it's inconveniently huge, but you may find that the ICU libraries have routines geared to this strategy.

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Not only is ICU helpful, it provides a dedicated type icu::UnicodeString, which can do all the fancy stuff you would expect of a Unicode-aware string class. However, in-memory storage is UTF-16, not UTF-8, so beware of memory consumption. –  DevSolar Aug 7 at 15:14

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