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I've been at this for a week now doing my research on how to properly synchronize an ArrayList.

My main issue in a nutshell is I have a "master" ArrayList of objects. Different threads may come in and add/set/remove from this list. I need to be sure that when one thread is iterating through the ArrayList, another is not changing it.

Now I've read many articles on the "best" way of handling this:

  • use collections.synchronizedlist
  • use CopyOnWriteArrayList
  • use synchronized() blocks in conjunction with collections.synchronizedlist
  • use Vector (many people are against this)

Using synchronized blocks around every iteration, add/set/remove block seems to be kind of what I want, but people have said there is a lot of overhead.

So then I started playing with CopyOnWriteArrayList (I do way more reads than writes for my master ArrayList). This is fine for reading, but what a lot of forum threads neglect to mention is that elements cannote be added, set, or removed from the iterator itself. For example (a basic version, but imagine it in a multi-threaded environment):

public static void main(String[] args) {

    class TestObject{
        private String s = "";
        public TestObject(String s){
            this.s = s;
        }

        public void setTheString(String s){
            this.s = s;
        }

        public String getTheString(){
            return s;
        }
    }

    CopyOnWriteArrayList<TestObject> list = new CopyOnWriteArrayList<TestObject>();
    list.add(new TestObject("A"));
    list.add(new TestObject("B"));
    list.add(new TestObject("C"));
    list.add(new TestObject("D"));
    list.add(new TestObject("E"));

    ListIterator<TestObject> litr = list.listIterator();

    while(litr.hasNext()){
      TestObject test = litr.next();
      if(test.getTheString().equals("B")){
         litr.set(new TestObject("TEST"));
      }
    }
}

the line "litr.set(new TestObject("TEST"));" would throw a

java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException

And looking at the Java Documentation there is a specific line describing this behavior:

"Element-changing operations on iterators themselves (remove, set, and add) are not supported. These methods throw UnsupportedOperationException."

So then you are forced to modify that list by using

list.set(litr.previousIndex(), new TestObject("TEST"));

Now technically shouldn't this present a synchronization issue? If another thread were to come in at the same time, and say, remove all elements from "list" the iterator would not see that, it would go to set the "list" at a given index and would throw an exception because the element at that point no longer exists. I just don't understand the point of CopyOnWriteArrayList if you cant add an element through the iterator itself.

Am I missing the point with using CopyOnWriteArrayList?

Do I wrap every iterator that ends up having to add/set/remove an element in a synchronized block?

This HAS to be a common issue with multi-threading. I would have thought someone would have made a class that could handle all this without worry...

Thanks in advance for having a look at this!

share|improve this question
11  
"Fool-proof" and "multi-threaded" are mutually incompatible. –  SLaks Oct 19 '12 at 19:31
2  
I hope you've read Java Concurrency in Practice? Very hard to do this stuff right without taking the time to learn it. –  AAA Oct 19 '12 at 19:42
1  
Do you really need a List? How about using ConcurrentHashMap? –  Gray Oct 19 '12 at 19:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As you found out yourself, CopyOnWriteArrayList is NOT ABLE to make completely secure changes when someone is processing the data, especially not while iterating over the list. Because: Whenever you are working on the data, there is no context to make sure your complete block of statements accessing the list is executed before someone else changed the list data.

Therefore you MUST have any context (like synchronization) for all your access operations (also for reading!) that execute your whole data accessing block. For example:

ArrayList<String> list = getList();
synchronized (list) {
    int index = list.indexOf("test");
    // if the whole block would not be synchronized,
    // the index could be invalid after an external change
    list.remove(index);
}

Or for iterators:

synchronized (list) {
    for (String s : list) {
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}

But now comes the big problem with this type of synchronization: It is slow and doesn't allow multiple reading access.
Therefore it would be useful to build your own context for data access. I am going to use the ReentrantReadWriteLock to allow multiple reading access and improve the performance.
I'm very interested in this topic and will make such a context for the ArrayList and attach it here after I finished it.

20.10.2012 | 18:30 - EDIT: I created an own access context using the ReentrantReadWriteLock for a secure ArrayList.
Firstly I will insert the whole SecureArrayList class (the most of the first operations is just overriding and protecting), then I insert my Tester class with the explanation of the usage.
I just tested the access with one thread, not with many at the same time, but I'm pretty sure it works! If not, please tell me.

SecureArrayList:

package mydatastore.collections.concurrent;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.ConcurrentModificationException;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.ListIterator;
import java.util.NoSuchElementException;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantReadWriteLock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantReadWriteLock.ReadLock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantReadWriteLock.WriteLock;

/**
 * @date 19.10.2012
 * @author Thomas Jahoda
 *
 * uses ReentrantReadWriteLock
 */
public class SecureArrayList<E> extends ArrayList<E> {

    protected final ReentrantReadWriteLock rwLock;
    protected final ReadLock readLock;
    protected final WriteLock writeLock;

    public SecureArrayList() {
        super();
        this.rwLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
        readLock = rwLock.readLock();
        writeLock = rwLock.writeLock();
    }

    // write operations
    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.add(e);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void add(int index, E element) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            super.add(index, element);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.addAll(c);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(int index, Collection<? extends E> c) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.addAll(index, c);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.remove(o);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public E remove(int index) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.remove(index);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean removeAll(Collection<?> c) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.removeAll(c);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void removeRange(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            super.removeRange(fromIndex, toIndex);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public E set(int index, E element) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.set(index, element);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            super.clear();
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean retainAll(Collection<?> c) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            return super.retainAll(c);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void ensureCapacity(int minCapacity) {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            super.ensureCapacity(minCapacity);
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void trimToSize() {
        try {
            writeLock.lock();
            super.trimToSize();
        } finally {
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    //// now the read operations
    @Override
    public E get(int index) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.get(index);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.contains(o);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean containsAll(Collection<?> c) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.containsAll(c);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Object clone() {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.clone();
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.equals(o);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.hashCode();
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int indexOf(Object o) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.indexOf(o);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Object[] toArray() {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.toArray();
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isEmpty() { // not sure if have to override because the size is temporarly stored in every case...
        // it could happen that the size is accessed when it just gets assigned a new value, 
        // and the thread is switched after assigning 16 bits or smth... i dunno
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.isEmpty();
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int size() {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.size();
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int lastIndexOf(Object o) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.lastIndexOf(o);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public List<E> subList(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.subList(fromIndex, toIndex);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a) {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.toArray(a);
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        try {
            readLock.lock();
            return super.toString();
        } finally {
            readLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    ////// iterators
    @Override
    public Iterator<E> iterator() {
        return new SecureArrayListIterator();
    }

    @Override
    public ListIterator<E> listIterator() {
        return new SecureArrayListListIterator(0);
    }

    @Override
    public ListIterator<E> listIterator(int index) {
        return new SecureArrayListListIterator(index);
    }
    // deligated lock mechanisms

    public void lockRead() {
        readLock.lock();
    }

    public void unlockRead() {
        readLock.unlock();
    }

    public void lockWrite() {
        writeLock.lock();
    }

    public void unlockWrite() {
        writeLock.unlock();
    }

    // getters
    public ReadLock getReadLock() {
        return readLock;
    }

    /**
     * The writeLock also has access to reading, so when holding write, the
     * thread can also obtain the readLock. But while holding the readLock and
     * attempting to lock write, it will result in a deadlock.
     *
     * @return
     */
    public WriteLock getWriteLock() {
        return writeLock;
    }

    protected class SecureArrayListIterator implements Iterator<E> {

        int cursor;       // index of next element to return
        int lastRet = -1; // index of last element returned; -1 if no such

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return cursor != size();
        }

        @Override
        public E next() {
            //  checkForComodification();
            int i = cursor;
            if (i >= SecureArrayList.super.size()) {
                throw new NoSuchElementException();
            }
            cursor = i + 1;
            lastRet = i;
            return SecureArrayList.super.get(lastRet);
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            if (!writeLock.isHeldByCurrentThread()) {
                throw new IllegalMonitorStateException("when the iteration uses write operations,"
                        + "the complete iteration loop must hold a monitor for the writeLock");
            }
            if (lastRet < 0) {
                throw new IllegalStateException("No element iterated over");
            }
            try {
                SecureArrayList.super.remove(lastRet);
                cursor = lastRet;
                lastRet = -1;
            } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException ex) {
                throw new ConcurrentModificationException(); // impossibru, except for bugged child classes
            }
        }
        //  protected final void checkForComodification() {
        //      if (modCount != expectedModCount) {
        //          throw new IllegalMonitorStateException("The complete iteration must hold the read or write lock!");
        //      }
        //  }
    }

    /**
     * An optimized version of AbstractList.ListItr
     */
    protected class SecureArrayListListIterator extends SecureArrayListIterator implements ListIterator<E> {

        protected SecureArrayListListIterator(int index) {
            super();
            cursor = index;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean hasPrevious() {
            return cursor != 0;
        }

        @Override
        public int nextIndex() {
            return cursor;
        }

        @Override
        public int previousIndex() {
            return cursor - 1;
        }

        @Override
        public E previous() {
            //  checkForComodification();
            int i = cursor - 1;
            if (i < 0) {
                throw new NoSuchElementException("No element iterated over");
            }
            cursor = i;
            lastRet = i;
            return SecureArrayList.super.get(lastRet);
        }

        @Override
        public void set(E e) {
            if (!writeLock.isHeldByCurrentThread()) {
                throw new IllegalMonitorStateException("when the iteration uses write operations,"
                        + "the complete iteration loop must hold a monitor for the writeLock");
            }
            if (lastRet < 0) {
                throw new IllegalStateException("No element iterated over");
            }
            //  try {
            SecureArrayList.super.set(lastRet, e);
            //  } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException ex) {
            //      throw new ConcurrentModificationException(); // impossibru, except for bugged child classes
            //          EDIT: or any failed direct editing while iterating over the list
            //  }
        }

        @Override
        public void add(E e) {
            if (!writeLock.isHeldByCurrentThread()) {
                throw new IllegalMonitorStateException("when the iteration uses write operations,"
                        + "the complete iteration loop must hold a monitor for the writeLock");
            }
            //  try {
            int i = cursor;
            SecureArrayList.super.add(i, e);
            cursor = i + 1;
            lastRet = -1;
            //  } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException ex) {
            //      throw new ConcurrentModificationException(); // impossibru, except for bugged child classes
            //          // EDIT: or any failed direct editing while iterating over the list
            //  }
        }
    }
}

SecureArrayList_Test:

package mydatastore.collections.concurrent;

import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.ListIterator;

/**
 * @date 19.10.2012
 * @author Thomas Jahoda
 */
public class SecureArrayList_Test {

    private static SecureArrayList<String> statList = new SecureArrayList<>();

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        accessExamples();
//        mechanismTest_1();
//        mechanismTest_2();
    }

    private static void accessExamples() {
        final SecureArrayList<String> list = getList();
        //
        try {
            list.lockWrite();
            //
            list.add("banana");
            list.add("test");
        } finally {
            list.unlockWrite();
        }
        ////// independent single statement reading or writing access
        String val = list.get(0);
        //// ---

        ////// reading only block (just some senseless unoptimized 'whatever' example)
        int lastIndex = -1;
        try {
            list.lockRead();
            //
            String search = "test";
            if (list.contains(search)) {
                lastIndex = list.lastIndexOf(search);
            }
            // !!! MIND !!!
            // inserting writing operations here results in a DEADLOCK!!!
            // ... which is just really, really awkward...
        } finally {
            list.unlockRead();
        }
        //// ---

        ////// writing block (can also contain reading operations!!)
        try {
            list.lockWrite();
            //
            int index = list.indexOf("test");
            if (index != -1) {
                String newVal = "banana";
                list.add(index + 1, newVal);
            }
        } finally {
            list.unlockWrite();
        }
        //// ---

        ////// iteration for reading only
        System.out.println("First output: ");
        try {
            list.lockRead();
            //
            for (Iterator<String> it = list.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
                String string = it.next();
                System.out.println(string);
                // !!! MIND !!!
                // inserting writing operations called directly on the list will result in a deadlock!
                // inserting writing operations called on the iterator will result in an IllegalMonitorStateException!
            }
        } finally {
            list.unlockRead();
        }
        System.out.println("------");
        //// ---

        ////// iteration for writing and reading
        try {
            list.lockWrite();
            //
            boolean firstAdd = true;
            for (ListIterator<String> it = list.listIterator(); it.hasNext();) {
                int index = it.nextIndex();
                String string = it.next();
                switch (string) {
                    case "banana":
                        it.remove();
                        break;
                    case "test":
                        if (firstAdd) {
                            it.add("whatever");
                            firstAdd = false;
                        }
                        break;
                }
                if (index == 2) {
                    list.set(index - 1, "pretty senseless data and operations but just to show "
                            + "what's possible");
                }
                // !!! MIND !!!
                // Only I implemented the iterators to enable direct list editing,
                // other implementations normally throw a ConcurrentModificationException
            }
        } finally {
            list.unlockWrite();
        }
        //// ---

        System.out.println("Complete last output: ");
        try {
            list.lockRead();
            //
            for (String string : list) {
                System.out.println(string);
            }
        } finally {
            list.unlockRead();
        }
        System.out.println("------");


        ////// getting the last element
        String lastElement = null;
        try {
            list.lockRead();
            int size = list.size();
            lastElement = list.get(size - 1);
        } finally {
            list.unlockRead();
        }
        System.out.println("Last element: " + lastElement);
        //// ---
    }

    private static void mechanismTest_1() { // fus, roh
        SecureArrayList<String> list = getList();
        try {
            System.out.print("fus, ");
            list.lockRead();
            System.out.print("roh, ");
            list.lockWrite();
            System.out.println("dah!"); // never happens cos of deadlock
        } finally {
            // also never happens
            System.out.println("dah?");
            list.unlockRead();
            list.unlockWrite();
        }
    }

    private static void mechanismTest_2() { // fus, roh, dah!
        SecureArrayList<String> list = getList();
        try {
            System.out.print("fus, ");
            list.lockWrite();
            System.out.print("roh, ");
            list.lockRead();
            System.out.println("dah!");
        } finally {
            list.unlockRead();
            list.unlockWrite();
        }
        // successful execution
    }

    private static SecureArrayList<String> getList() {
        return statList;
    }
}

Edit: I've added a couple test cases to demonstrate the functionality in threads. The above class works perfectly and I'm now using it in my main project (Liam):

private static void threadedWriteLock(){
    final ThreadSafeArrayList<String> list = getList();

    Thread threadOne;
    Thread threadTwo;
    final long lStartMS = System.currentTimeMillis();

    list.add("String 1");
    list.add("String 2");

    System.out.println("******* basic write lock test *******");

    threadOne = new Thread(new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            try {
                list.lockWrite();

                try {
                    Thread.sleep(2000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            } finally {
                list.unlockWrite();
            }
        }
    });

    threadTwo = new Thread(new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            //give threadOne time to lock (just in case)
            try {
                Thread.sleep(5);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

            System.out.println("Expect a wait....");

            //if this "add" line is commented out, even the iterator read will be locked. 
            //So its not only locking on the add, but also the read which is correct.
            list.add("String 3"); 

            for (ListIterator<String> it = list.listIterator(); it.hasNext();) {
                 System.out.println("String at index " + it.nextIndex() + ": " + it.next());
            }

            System.out.println("ThreadTwo completed in " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - lStartMS) + "ms");

        }
    });

    threadOne.start();
    threadTwo.start();
}

private static void threadedReadLock(){
    final ThreadSafeArrayList<String> list = getList();

    Thread threadOne;
    Thread threadTwo;
    final long lStartMS = System.currentTimeMillis();

    list.add("String 1");
    list.add("String 2");

    System.out.println("******* basic read lock test *******");

    threadOne = new Thread(new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            try {
                list.lockRead();

                try {
                    Thread.sleep(2000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            } finally {
                list.unlockRead();
            }
        }
    });

    threadTwo = new Thread(new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            //give threadOne time to lock (just in case)
            try {
                Thread.sleep(5);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

            System.out.println("Expect a wait if adding, but not reading....");

            //if this "add" line is commented out, the read will continue without holding up the thread
            list.add("String 3"); 

            for (ListIterator<String> it = list.listIterator(); it.hasNext();) {
                 System.out.println("String at index " + it.nextIndex() + ": " + it.next());
            }

            System.out.println("ThreadTwo completed in " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - lStartMS) + "ms");

        }
    });

    threadOne.start();
    threadTwo.start();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm under the same impression that we have to wrap everything in synchronized blocks. I look forward to your input! Sounds like it would be more elegant than what I would come up with hehe. –  Liam Oct 20 '12 at 2:13
    
@Liam I uploaded my work, please read it through carefully and ask anything unclear here. (And please don't forget to accept an answer [preferable mine :DD ]) –  Rastax Oct 20 '12 at 16:46
    
Testing now. I'll get back to you shortly! Looks interesting... –  Liam Oct 22 '12 at 18:09
    
Well Thomas, I think you nailed it. This is really great work. I have a couple Java 6 compatibility edits to your example pending, and I'd like to add my two threading examples where I was able to prove your work. It looks like I can edit your post, but I don't want to edit your contribution without talking about it first with you. How would you like to do this? –  Liam Oct 22 '12 at 19:44
    
Thank you, I am really happy to see you appreciating my work. :D Would it be okay to mark an edit and add your Java 6 version (normally there are just some minor changes?) as external link and your examples as both, external link and inserted html code? If you want to, you could add me on skype. I'll write my account name under this comment to delete it afterwards. –  Rastax Oct 22 '12 at 22:14

Another approach is to protect all access to the list, but with a ReadWriteLock instead of synchronized blocks.

This allows simultaneous reads in a safe manner, and could improve performance a lot in a scenario with many reads and few writes.

share|improve this answer

Use CopyOnWriteArrayList, and synchronize on write operations only

CopyOnWriteArrayList<TestObject> list = ...

final Object writeLock = new Object();

void writeOpA()
{
    synchronized(writeLock)
    {
        read/write list
    }
}
void writeOpB()
{
    synchronized(writeLock)
    {
        read/write list
    }
}

Therefore no two write sessions will overlap with each other.

Reads require no lock. But a read session may see a changing list. If we want a read session to see a snapshot of the list, either use iterator(), or take a snapshot by toArray().


It's probably even better if you do the copy-on-write yourselves

volatile Foo data = new Foo(); // ArrayList in your case

final Object writeLock = new Object();

void writeOpA()
{
    synchronized(writeLock)
    {
        Foo clone = data.clone();
        // read/write clone
        data = clone;
    }
}
void writeOpB()
{
    // similar...
}

void readSession()
{
    Foo snapshot = data;
    // read snapshot
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just to mention it: We are searching a completely secure solution for every possibility.<br> It's okay to synchronize all blocks with write actions only when you only use reading operations consisting of unrelated or single statements. But if you process blocks of related reading activitiy, you also have to synchronize those in your solution. <br><br> Btw, cloning the list also clones the contained data, not just the references, which is just really, really bad, so I would be thankful to make a regarding comment or delete this action. –  Rastax Oct 19 '12 at 22:25
    
The read session reads a snapshot of the data; the snapshot doesn't change, so the entire read session sees a consistent state. –  irreputable Oct 19 '12 at 23:24
    
It doesn't because it is possible that between 2 read operations (whereas the 2nd depends on the result of the first), another thread makes changes to the data. The 2nd reading operation would use the new data, not any snapshot. Especially not in your 2nd example where you are using ArrayList only. –  Rastax Oct 19 '12 at 23:43
    
Ok I just took a second look at it. Your 2nd example would kinda work (except for your cloning I mentioned before), but it is an extremely ugly and slow solution... just saying –  Rastax Oct 20 '12 at 13:26

If you're modifying during an iteration, yeah, you have to use option 3. None of the others will actually do what you want.

More specifically: given what you want to do, you have to lock the entire list for the length of the iteration, because you might modify it in the middle, which would corrupt any other iterators working on the list at the same time. That means option 3, since the Java language can't just have a "synchronized iterator" -- the iterator itself can only synchronize individual calls to hasNext() or next(), but it can't synchronize across the entire length of the iteration.

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Well the reason for a modification during the iteration is I have to do a look up. In my master array there is an object with an ID associated. So if I'm doing a look up for that ID, I need to modify that object at that index. I would assume that is a pretty common practice no? –  Liam Oct 19 '12 at 19:40
    
"So if I'm doing a look up for that ID, I need to modify that object at that index." Two thoughts here -- a) why do you need to modify the object? b) Maybe you should modify the contents of the object, rather than trying to replace the object in the list. Those are the "common practices" I can think of. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 19 '12 at 19:41
    
Well I'm working with an API that gives me back entire new objects. I mean I could copy each of the variables in rather than replacing the object, but it still suffers from the same issue that say, and item in the master arraylist is removed, and now I'm modifying index (4) or something which no longer points to the correct object. :S So you are saying I should synchronize block everything? I'm just really wondering if I'm missing a key data structure technique here. I mean it seems logical to me the way I'm doing it, but maybe there is a better one... –  Liam Oct 19 '12 at 19:49
    
Use Collections.synchronizedList, and do synchronized(list) around any iteration you do -- around the entire iteration, not just individual parts of the iteration. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 19 '12 at 20:47

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