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I want to check only the value [id] for duplicates, and remove all keys where this "field" [id] is a duplicate.

Example: If I have numbers 1,2,1. I want the result to be 2, not 1,2. And criteria for duplicates is determined only by checking [id], not any other "field".

Original array:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => John
            [id] => 123
            [color] => red
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [name] => Paul
            [id] => 958
            [color] => red
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [name] => Jennifer
            [id] => 123
            [color] => yellow
        )
)

The result I want:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => Paul
            [id] => 958
            [color] => red
        )

)
share|improve this question
5  
Have you tried anything? –  alestanis Oct 19 '12 at 20:09
4  
Is there any reason you cannot just for loop through this? If so explain, but otherwise, we are not the code factory you've been looking for. –  thatidiotguy Oct 19 '12 at 20:09
    
yes, I tried this: –  user1760417 Oct 19 '12 at 20:12
    
You can use bubble sort like algorithm to remove duplicates. So if there is a match remove both elements without the sorting part. –  infinity Oct 19 '12 at 20:13
1  
@infinity what if there are an odd number of repeating elements? –  Eagle Oct 19 '12 at 20:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should be fairly easy to accomplish with a couple of simple loops:

set_time_limit(0); // Disable time limit to allow enough time to process a large dataset

// $items contains your data

$id_counts = array();
foreach ($items as $item) {
    if (array_key_exists($item['id'], $id_counts)) {
        $id_counts[$item['id']]++;
    } else {
        $id_counts[$item['id']] = 1;
    }
}

for ($i = count($items); $i >= 0; $i--) {
    if ($id_counts[$items[$i]['id']] > 1) {
        array_splice($items, $i, 1);
    }
}

Result:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => Paul
            [id] => 958
            [color] => red
        )
)

While there are neater ways to do it, one advantage of this method is you're only creating new arrays for the list of ids and duplicate ids and the array_splice is removing the duplicates from the original array, so memory usage is kept to a minimum.

Edit: Fixed a bug that meant it sometimes left one behind

share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much, it worked! I've been trying to do this for 12 hours already... –  user1760417 Oct 19 '12 at 20:33
    
FYI - just re-read the code and realised the nested loop in the second step was unnecessary; edited it to be faster and simpler. –  Kelvin Mackay Oct 19 '12 at 20:40
    
it works great for "small" amount of arrays, however when I tried to process 40,000 my browser produced 500 internal server error after 2 minutes. I guess it is some sort of a timeout. Is there any way to make this more efficient? I would need to probably process about 1 million arrays. –  user1760417 Oct 19 '12 at 23:33
    
You can disable the timeout with set_time_limit, which will allow the script to run for as long as it needs to. I've also updated the code to make it faster and consume even less memory, see my most recent edit. Hopefully this will help - check your logs if you're still getting an error, as you may need to increase the script's memory limit too (see memory_limit) –  Kelvin Mackay Oct 20 '12 at 0:19
1  
thank you!! :-) –  user1760417 Oct 20 '12 at 1:17

I agree with everyone above, you should give us more information about what you've tried, but I like to code golf, so here's a completely unreadble solution:

$new_array = array_filter($array, function($item) use (&$array){
    return count(array_filter($array, function($node) use (&$item){
        return $node['id'] == $item['id'];
    })) < 2;
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "code golf" :) –  Kelvin Mackay Oct 19 '12 at 20:25

This is a very basic approach to the answer and I am sure there are much better answers however I would probably start by doing it the way I would on paper.

I look at the first index, check its value. Then I go through every other index making note of their index if the value is the same as my originally noted value. Once I have gone through the list if I have more than one index with that particular value I remove them all (starting with the highest index, so as to not affect indexes of the others while deleting).

Do this for all other indexes till you reach the end of the list.

It is long winded but will make sure it removes all values which have duplicates. and leaves only those which originally had no duplicates.

share|improve this answer
function PickUniques(array $items){
    // Quick way out
    if(empty($items)) return array();
    $counters = array();
    // Count occurences
    foreach($items as $item){
        $item['id'] = intval($item['id']);
        if(!isset($counters[$item['id']])){
            $counters[$item['id']] = 0;
        }
        $counters[$item['id']]++;
    }
    // Pop multiples occurence ones
    foreach($counters as $id => $occurences){
        if($occurences > 1){
            unset($counters[$id]);
        }
    }
    // Keep only those that occur once (in $counters)
    $valids = array();
    foreach($items as $item){
        if(!isset($items[$item['id']])) continue;
        $valids[$item['id']] = $item;
    }
    return $valids;
}

Try this one :)

share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't want ANY match of duplicates. –  Barmar Oct 19 '12 at 20:15
    
I must be drunk. Fixing it in a moment :) –  CodeAngry Oct 19 '12 at 20:16

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