Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data frame in the following form

           SPY.Open SPY.High SPY.Low SPY.Close SPY.Volume SPY.Adjusted
2007-01-03   142.25   142.86  140.57    141.37   94807600       125.38
2007-01-04   141.23   142.05  140.61    141.67   69620600       125.65
2007-01-05   141.33   141.40  140.38    140.54   76645300       124.64
2007-01-08   140.82   141.41  140.25    141.19   71655000       125.22
2007-01-09   141.31   141.60  140.40    141.07   75680100       125.11
2007-01-10   140.58   141.57  140.30    141.54   72428000       125.53

however the command index(DATA.FRAME) return integers rather than dates. What function should I use to get a list of dates instead of integers?

EDIT:

The output of dput(DATA.FRAME) is

structure(list(SPY.Open = c(142.25, 141.23, 141.33, 140.82, 141.31, 
140.58), SPY.High = c(142.86, 142.05, 141.4, 141.41, 141.6, 141.57
), SPY.Low = c(140.57, 140.61, 140.38, 140.25, 140.4, 140.3), 
    SPY.Close = c(141.37, 141.67, 140.54, 141.19, 141.07, 141.54
    ), SPY.Volume = c(94807600, 69620600, 76645300, 71655000, 
    75680100, 72428000), SPY.Adjusted = c(125.38, 125.65, 124.64, 
    125.22, 125.11, 125.53)), .Names = c("SPY.Open", "SPY.High", 
"SPY.Low", "SPY.Close", "SPY.Volume", "SPY.Adjusted"), row.names = c("2007-01-03", 
"2007-01-04", "2007-01-05", "2007-01-08", "2007-01-09", "2007-01-10"
), class = "data.frame")
share|improve this question
    
Can you post the output of dput(foo) where foo is the object you show. Or if foo is big, the output from dput(head(foo))? That way we can see what type of object this is. index() is usually for a zoo object, but your data frame seems to have the dates as rownames so perhaps these haven't been recognised as data by whatever process you used? –  Gavin Simpson Oct 19 '12 at 20:16
5  
The index function is meant to be used with zoo, xts, and ts class objects. Using it on a data.frame doesn't make sense. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 19 '12 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with the command index in R. It looks like the dates are stored as the rownames of your data frame.

I would try:

as.Date(rownames(DataFrameName))

Alternatively, you can turn integers into dates in R. I forget exactly how, but basically you just need one conversation factor (say 15344 = Oct. 9th 2007 or something) - it should be in ?as.Date or ?as.POSIXct

share|improve this answer
    
Worked perfectly, thanks very much –  lab_notes Oct 19 '12 at 20:30
rownames(DATA.FRAME) #results in character vector
#[1] "2007-01-03" "2007-01-04" "2007-01-05" "2007-01-08" "2007-01-09" "2007-01-10"

as.Date(rownames(DATA.FRAME)) #convert to date
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.