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I'm maintaining software that contains a bunch of user groups. When an Admin clicks "Remove" on a user of a group, two things should happen:

  1. delete the group member (involves updating cache, db, etc.)
  2. reload a list of group members (the user sees this list when he/she deletes a user)

It turns out that #2 finishes before #1 - race condition. As a result, I want to add a callback so that #2 does not execute until #1 is successful.

Is this code acceptable for GWT to ensure #2 occurs before #1?

 doTask1();

 GWT.runAsync(new RunAsyncCallback()
 {
   public void onFailure(final Throwable reason)
   {
   }

   public void onSuccess()
   {                       
     doTask2();
   }
 });
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

GWT#runAsync() is used for GWT's "code splitting" feature, which allows deferred loading of code (and other runtime resources) until they are needed. You need to use GWT's asynchronous operation patterns (i.e. AsyncCallback or Command) to pass a callback to doTask1() that is invoked once the asynchronous operations there complete. For example, if doTask1() executes a GWT RPC method:

public void doTask1(final Command onCompletion) {
  myRpcService.doTask1(new AsyncCallback<Void>() {
    @Override
    public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {
      // Error handling
    }

    @Override
    public void onSuccess(Void ignored) {
      onCompletion.execute();
    }
  });
}

public void doTask2() {
  // Perform task 2
}

public void doTasks1And2() {
  doTask1(new Command() {
    @Override
    public void execute() {
      doTask2();
    }
  });
}
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Thanks, Jason. Where does doTasks1and2() get called? I would've expected it to be called within the myRpcService.doTask1(...). –  Kevin Meredith Oct 22 '12 at 14:23
    
doTasks1And2() is just an example of how you would invoke doTask1() with a Command that executes doTask2() once the asynchronous task in doTask1() completes. –  Jason Terk Oct 22 '12 at 16:30

No, you can still have a race condition with that style of control flow. Instead, you want something like this:

doTask1(new MyCallback() {
    public void onTask1Complete() {
       doTask2();
    }
}

doTask1() needs to accept a callback so that once it is complete, it will execute the next operation.

To see why, let's assume that both doTask1() and doTask2() are making HTTP calls. You have no guarantee what order the server might receive these two connections unless you wait until the doTask1()'s request has returned . In your example code, you make the request in doTask1() (which immediately returns while the request is asynchronously made), and then make the second call without waiting for the first.

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With my code change, doTask1() completes, and then doTask2() begins. But you're saying that my code does not actually ensure that doTask2() does not begin until doTask1() finishes? –  Kevin Meredith Oct 20 '12 at 2:53
    
Does doTask1() do anything asynchronously? (i.e. make an RPC or RequestFactory call?) From your question it seems like it does. These calls are actually made by making an HTTP request in the browser asynchronously (this is usually called an AJAX request). When that call is made, control immediately returns, and you usually provide a callback to the RPC method in order to determine whether it succeeded or failed. All the client side code in doTask1() will complete, but anything that it executes asynchronously may or may not (including anything going on server-side). –  ben_w Oct 20 '12 at 3:12
    
yes. doTask1() and doTask2() are both AJAX calls. 1 removes a user from a list and #2 displays the list again. You're saying that, in my code, I did not actually create callbacks such that doTask2() will not begin until doTask1() has completed successfully? –  Kevin Meredith Oct 20 '12 at 3:14
    
Yes. GWT.runAsync simply schedules a piece of code to run later in the event queue. So control will return to the browser to do whatever it needs to (respond to click events, etc.) and then it will run task2. However, it could still execute before the AJAX call started in task1 completes because they are unrelated. –  ben_w Oct 20 '12 at 3:17
    
This link might be helpful: developers.google.com/web-toolkit/doc/latest/… –  ben_w Oct 20 '12 at 3:22

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