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We have a very old code base(that actually is not horrible quality). It dates back to when .Net was pre-release, which I suspect is the cause of some of these weird conventions.

Anyway, we just began to drop .Net 1.1 support and are having a hay-day with converting things to generics and using Linq and all that fun stuff. One of the most annoying patterns in our code base though is we'll have something like

private ArrayList mylist;
public IEnumerator MyList
{
  get
  {
    if(mylist==null)
      return new EmptyEnumerator.Enumerator;
    return mylist.GetEnumerator();
  }
}

This pattern is particularly horrible because it prevents us from simply doing foreach(var item in MyList) because IEnumerator doesn't implement IEnumerable. Instead we must do something like this:

IEnumerator enumerator=MyList;
while(enumerator.MoveNext())
{
    object item=enumerator.Current;
}

So, for refactoring, we of course want to use something like ReadOnlyCollection<T> or IList<T> or similar. To do this however, we have to update every single reference to MyList to do:

IEnumerator enumerator=MyList;

to

IEnumerator enumerator=MyList.GetEnumerator();

In some cases, we can have over a hundred references to one property. Are there any tools out there that can make this easier? We recently got Resharper(not for this issue, but just for general use), but it doesn't appear to cover this type of scenario.

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2  
Why not fix up the uses - instead of keeping calling GetEnumerator() manually? I would expect most of them would end up being foreach loops anyway, right? –  Jon Skeet Oct 19 '12 at 20:36
    
Are the usages consistent enough that you could regex or write a quick script to read all the .cs files and find/replace the pattern? –  Chris Sinclair Oct 19 '12 at 20:37
    
@JonSkeet We'd love to, but we don't have a month to dedicate to the task :) So our plan right now is to fix the root cause now so we can write good new code, and fix old code as we come across it –  Earlz Oct 19 '12 at 20:38
1  
Screw automation, just get an intern. –  Servy Oct 19 '12 at 20:38
    
@Earlz Could you have two properties, one that's an IEnumerator (the existing one) and one that's an IEnumerable<T> with a similar name. New uses use the new property, old ones use the old one. Refactor out uses of the old one as you come across it, and then remove it entirely when you can. –  Servy Oct 19 '12 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

What it sounds like you need to do is return a class that implements both IEnumerator and IEnumerable<T>

It's not actually that hard to just make your own type that does this:

public class MessedUpIterator<T> : IEnumerable<T>, IEnumerator
{
    private IEnumerable<T> source;
    private IEnumerator enumerator;

    private IEnumerator MyEnumerator
    {
        get
        {
            return enumerator ?? source.GetEnumerator();
        }
    }

    public MessedUpIterator(IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        this.source = source;
    }
    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return source.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return source.GetEnumerator();
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get { return MyEnumerator.Current; }
    }

    bool IEnumerator.MoveNext()
    {
        return MyEnumerator.MoveNext();
    }

    void IEnumerator.Reset()
    {
        MyEnumerator.Reset();
    }
}

Now instead of returning either an IEnumerator or an IEnumerable<T> you can return something that does both.

Note that IEnumerator is implemented explicitly while IEnumerable<T> is implemented implicitly, so it will encourage using it as an IEnumerable, while still make using it as an IEnumerator possible.

Yes, it's ugly, but it certainly could be worse.

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We're trying to make our code better, not more hackish. Also, if we decide to allow something like IList because a piece of code needs it's additional functions instead of IEnumerable, this solution will fall through –  Earlz Oct 19 '12 at 20:51
    
@Earlz It would be easy enough to make a class that implemented both IList<T> and IEnumerator. Since IList<T> extends IEnumerable<T> it would be a pretty trivial change; mostly just making stubs for each IList method that call the method on an IList stored internally. As for it being hackish, you ruled out actual fixes to the problem by specifying that caller code not be changed. –  Servy Oct 19 '12 at 20:54
    
Well, the caller code can be changed, just not drastically. Hence why I was looking for some way to automatically append .GetEnumerator() to each reference of a property –  Earlz Oct 19 '12 at 20:55
1  
@Earlz This might be a good stepping stone though. Implement this for your close release, then do a point-release after with everything done correctly. Either that or you might have to resort to the most fundamental tool of all over an upcoming weekend: bloody fingertips. –  Chris Sinclair Oct 19 '12 at 20:56
1  
Chris has it right. You use something like this for the short term, so that you are able to use the correct method for new code. Then, when you have the available resources, go in and just change this type to not implement IEnumerator. Then just go around fixing code everywhere there's a syntax error. When you run out of time, fix this class so everything compiles. When you have fixed it all then you can remove this type entirely, or just commit the change to not implement IEnumerator. –  Servy Oct 19 '12 at 21:04

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