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I want to count how often a certain digit appears within an integer. I have the following code:

int main()
{
    printf ("Put numbers\n");

    int cislo;
    int s0,s1,s2,s3,s4,s5,s6,s7,s8,s9;

    while(scanf("%d",&cislo)==1){
        if (cislo<0)
            printf ("Cislo %d, je zaporne, takove neberu", cislo);
        continue;
    }

    s0=s1=s2=s3=s4=s5=s6=s7=s8=s9=0;
    do{
        (cislo/=10);
        switch (cislo%10){
            case 0: ++s0; break;
            case 1: ++s1; break;
            case 2: ++s2; break;
            case 3: ++s3; break;
            case 4: ++s4; break;
            case 5: ++s5; break;
            case 6: ++s6; break;
            case 7: ++s7; break;
            case 8: ++s8; break;
            case 9: ++s9; break;
        }
    }while (cislo>0);

    printf ("Zadane cislo se sklada z cislic: \n\n 0 ... %dx \n 1 ... %dx \n 2 ... %dx \n 3 ... %dx \n 4 ... %dx \n 5 ... %dx \n 6 ... %dx \n 7 ... %dx \n 8 ... %dx \n 9 ... %dx \n",s0,s1,s2,s3,s4,s5,s6,s7,s8,s9);

    return 0;
}

How it must work:

Put number:
1111111111

Number: 1111111111 

include:
0 ...  0x
1 ... 10x
2 ...  0x
3 ...  0x
4 ...  0x
5 ...  0x
6 ...  0x
7 ...  0x
8 ...  0x
9 ...  0x

How it actually works:

Put number: 
1111111111

Number: 1111111111 

include:
0 ...  1x
1 ...  9x
2 ...  0x
3 ...  0x
4 ...  0x
5 ...  0x
6 ...  0x
7 ...  0x
8 ...  0x
9 ...  0x

Does anyone know why?

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closed as not a real question by Inisheer, Jonathan Leffler, Hristo Iliev, Monolo, Mark Rotteveel Oct 20 '12 at 9:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
please edit your question, it's unreadable. –  Ken Oct 19 '12 at 20:50
1  
You should work out what happens if you just put a single digit, e.g. 1, and the when you understand that, you can test 11 and then 11111111. (Debugging works best if you start with small/simple cases.) –  dbaupp Oct 19 '12 at 20:57
    
Please do yourself a favour and use an array. –  chris Oct 19 '12 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Divide the number after taking mod:

 do{
    switch (cislo%10){
    case 0: ++s0; break;
    case 1: ++s1; break;
    case 2: ++s2; break;
    case 3: ++s3; break;
    case 4: ++s4; break;
    case 5: ++s5; break;
    case 6: ++s6; break;
    case 7: ++s7; break;
    case 8: ++s8; break;
    case 9: ++s9; break;
    }
    cislo/=10;
 }while (cislo>0);

Because of this, you are missing one digit while counting.

Your input method is not very good. Since, you want to receive only one integer:

while(scanf("%d",&cislo)!=1){

is more appropriate.

You can also use an array s[10] instead of 10 integers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it works! –  piratteegon Oct 19 '12 at 21:07

Change the do/while loop:

do {
    int nextval = cislo / 10;

    switch (cislo - (nextval*10)) {
        case 0: ++s0; break;
        case 1: ++s1; break;
        case 2: ++s2; break;
        case 3: ++s3; break;
        case 4: ++s4; break;
        case 5: ++s5; break;
        case 6: ++s6; break;
        case 7: ++s7; break;
        case 8: ++s8; break;
        case 9: ++s9; break;
    }

    cislo = nextval;
} while (cislo>0);
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