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I have a single source file C++ program I'm trying to compile.

The header file looks like:

class merge {
public:
explicit merge(int argc, char* argv[]);
virtual ~merge();
};

And the source file looks like:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
merge mrg(argc,argv);
return 0;
}

merge::merge(map<string,string>& params) {
    //code
}

Trying to compile with: g++ merge.cpp -o merge

I get:

 merge.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
    merge.cpp:10: error: reference to ‘merge’ is ambiguous
    merge.h:12: error: candidates are: class merge
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-            linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_algo.h:3180: error: template<class     _InputIterator1, class _InputIterator2, class _OutputIterator, class _Compare>     _OutputIterator std::merge(_InputIterator1, _InputIterator1, _InputIterator2,     _InputIterator2, _OutputIterator, _Compare)
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_algo.h:3122: error: template<class     _InputIterator1, class _InputIterator2, class _OutputIterator> _OutputIterator     std::merge(_InputIterator1, _InputIterator1, _InputIterator2, _InputIterator2,     _OutputIterator)
    merge.cpp:10: error: reference to ‘merge’ is ambiguous
    merge.h:12: error: candidates are: class merge
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_algo.h:3180: error: template<class     _InputIterator1, class _InputIterator2, class _OutputIterator, class _Compare>     _OutputIterator std::merge(_InputIterator1, _InputIterator1, _InputIterator2,     _InputIterator2, _OutputIterator, _Compare)
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_algo.h:3122: error: template<class     _InputIterator1, class _InputIterator2, class _OutputIterator> _OutputIterator     std::merge(_InputIterator1, _InputIterator1, _InputIterator2, _InputIterator2,     _OutputIterator)
    merge.cpp:10: error: expected `;' before ‘mrg’
    merge.cpp: At global scope:
    merge.cpp:14: error: prototype for ‘merge::merge(std::map<std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::less<std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::allocator<std::pair<const     std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >,     std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > > >&)’ does not     match any in class ‘merge’
    merge.h:12: error: candidates are: merge::merge(const merge&)
    merge.h:14: error:                 merge::merge(int, char**)
    merge.cpp: In constructor ‘merge::merge(std::map<std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::less<std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::allocator<std::pair<const     std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >,     std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > > >&)’:
    merge.cpp:15: error: declaration of ‘std::map<std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::less<std::basic_string<char,     std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::allocator<std::pair<const     std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >,     std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > > > params’     shadows a parameter
    merge.cpp:16: error: ‘argc’ was not declared in this scope
    merge.cpp:16: error: ‘argv’ was not declared in this scope
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h: At global scope:
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h: In instantiation     of ‘std::iterator_traits<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>,     std::allocator<char> > >’:
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_vector.h:803:   instantiated from ‘void     std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_initialize_dispatch(_InputIterator, _InputIterator,     __false_type) [with _InputIterator = std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>,     std::allocator<char> >, _Tp = int, _Alloc = std::allocator<int>]’
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_vector.h:262:   instantiated from     ‘std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::vector(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, const _Alloc&) [with     _InputIterator = std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >,     _Tp = int, _Alloc = std::allocator<int>]’
    merge.cpp:86:   instantiated from here
    /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-    linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:129: error: no     type named ‘iterator_category’ in ‘struct std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>,     std::allocator<char> >’

Any idea what's wrong?

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closed as too localized by Vlad Lazarenko, Jonathan Leffler, Claus Jørgensen, Lucifer, Maerlyn Oct 20 '12 at 6:18

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Apparently, you included some standard library headers in your code, and there is a std::merge function which confuses the name lookup. Maybe you included using namespace std; too? Since we can't see the exact source you're compiling (there isn't a line 10 in the code you show!), we can't easily guess — and we shouldn't have to guess. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 20 '12 at 0:28

2 Answers 2

In the class declaration you have

explicit merge(int argc, char* argv[]);

But when you provide a definition for the constructor you have

merge::merge(map<string,string>& params) { /* ... */ }

Of course, the two must match.

Also, it seems you have a using namespace std; statement in your code somewhere. The compiler cannot resolve whether the calls to merge are to your merge class constructor or to std::merge.

The lesson to take away from this (other than fix your constructor):

DO NOT add using namespace std; anywhere in your code. std:: is not very cumbersome to type.

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Second "DO NOT add using namespace std; anywhere in your code". Want to add that, at least in my opinion, having std:: usually makes the code much more clear about things. –  BeyondSora Oct 19 '12 at 21:10
    
@BeyondSora may be work for you that now std well, but if someone is not familiar with std and declare a class and function that have same name as std class or function then it will get some strange errors like this one, and beside that if you want to compile your code by a future version of std you can't do that since std may add a class or function with same name as yours and your code will fail to compile. So if you feel uneasy with std:: just use those parts that you need, for example using std::cout –  BigBoss Oct 19 '12 at 22:13
1  
@user1701545 AFAIK in C++ explicit apply to constructors that only take one argument to avoid implicit conversion so constructors that take more than one argument(like merge constructor) never need to be explicit because the can't be implicit! –  BigBoss Oct 19 '12 at 22:16

The signature of merge's constructor does not match its definition.

In your class declaration, you defined merge::merge to take in two parameters, one int and the other char*. In the definition for merge::merge, however, you define it as taking in only one parameter of type map<string,string>&

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