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Given the starting value @pStartingValue and a table which contains rorDate and ror what is the most efficient way to get the NAV at each date using just TSQL?

This mathematically trivial, and simple in code. I have a naive SQL implementation currently that relies on cursors.

On the first date, the NAV is @pStartingValue * ror
On every subsequent date, it's the previously calculated nav * ror or it's @pStartingValue * every previous ror

How would you efficiently do this only in MSSQL2005+?

DECLARE @rorDate DATE
DECLARE @getDate CURSOR
DECLARE @lastNAV as DECIMAL(19,7)
DECLARE @datedRoR as float
DECLARE @NAVTotals TABLE
(
  NAV DECIMAL(19,7),
  navDate DATE
)


SET @lastNAV = 100

SET @getDate = CURSOR FOR
    SELECT 
        p.[DATE]
    FROM 
        performance p 
    ORDER BY 
        p.[DATE]

OPEN @getDate
FETCH NEXT
FROM @getDate INTO @rorDate
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN

SELECT 
    @datedRoR = b.finalNetReturn 
FROM 
    performance b 
WHERE 
    b.date = @rorDate

INSERT INTO @NAVTotals (NAV, navDate)
  VALUES (@lastNAV * (1 + @datedRoR), @rorDate)

SELECT 
    @lastNAV = c.NAV 
FROM 
    @NAVTotals c 
WHERE 
    c.navDate = @rorDate  


FETCH NEXT
FROM @getDate INTO @rorDate
END
CLOSE @getDate
DEALLOCATE @getDate

select * from @NAVTotals
share|improve this question
2  
Show us your cursor approach and your likely to get a much better result that matches your expected output. –  RThomas Oct 19 '12 at 21:07
    
@RThomas I have added my cursor implementation –  Matthew Oct 19 '12 at 21:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'll have to do some testing to see if the performance improves but this is a way to do that same thing without using a cursor. It's untested so you'll want to make sure to test it. I also cast b.finalNetReturn as a float, if it's already a float you can remove that part.

DECLARE @lastNAV as DECIMAL(19,7)

SET @lastNAV = 100    

DECLARE @NAVTotals TABLE
(
  NAV DECIMAL(19,7),
  navDate DATE
);

INSERT INTO @NAVTotals (navDate) 
   SELECT [DATE]
    FROM performance
    ORDER BY [DATE] ASC;

UPDATE NT
SET @lastNAV = Nav = (@lastNAV * (1.0 +
 (Cast((SELECT b.finalNetReturn 
        FROM performance b 
        WHERE b.date = NT.navDate) AS FLOAT)))) 
FROM @NAVTotals NT;

SELECT * FROM @NAVTotals ORDER BY navDate;

By dropping the lastNAV variable into the update statement you can update both. It works similar to:

a = a + 1

There is an example of this same approach here. Including some good numbers that compare the efficiency of the approach to other approaches such as cursors.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how @lastNAV gets set? This doesn't seem like it will work. –  Matthew Oct 19 '12 at 21:59
    
Sorry, I was typing faster than I was thinking. Take a look now. I think this should work - it's an approach I've used in the past for running total type operations. If I've misunderstood what your trying to do let me know. –  RThomas Oct 19 '12 at 22:08
    
Doesn't execute, must declare scalar variable @NAVTotals, you can't use the table reference as a scalar in your subquery. –  Matthew Oct 19 '12 at 23:15
    
You'll have to use a table alias - and with an update you have to be even trickier. Fixed answer (again). –  RThomas Oct 19 '12 at 23:33
    
Your solution works, but not for my actual implementation. I thought I would simplify it for posting it here, but in reality I have more than one asset in the table (related by assetID) to a "StartingAssetValue" table. I do think, though, that you answered the question asked! –  Matthew Oct 23 '12 at 15:19

Perhaps I'm not understanding it correctly, but you don't even need a stored proc to achieve this.

SELECT p.[DATE] AS navDate
     , @pStartingValue * PRODUCT(1 + b.finalNetReturn) AS NAV
  FROM performance p
 INNER JOIN performance b
    ON b.[DATE] <= p.[DATE]
 GROUP BY p.[DATE]
 ORDER BY p.[DATE]

However, there are a few "wierdness" that I don't grasp.

  1. How come there is no range limit for p.[DATE]?
  2. Does the "performance" table really have only one asset?
share|improve this answer
    
Your query won't work, it simply multiplies startingvalue by each ror, but doesn't accumulate them. And no, the table has multiple assets but I access them one at a time so I can append the 'WHERE' clause as needed. I just removed it from the sample. –  Matthew Oct 20 '12 at 19:23
    
Did you run it? PRODUCT is an aggregate function. Also take note on the alias p or b. –  Robert Co Oct 20 '12 at 19:35
    
there is no PRODUCT aggregate function in MSSQL. –  Matthew Oct 22 '12 at 14:35

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