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Consider the following code:

class Vehicle {

    /**
    * Create a new instance of Vehicle
    * 
    * @return Vehicle
    */
    public static function create(){

        return eval( "return new " . get_called_class() . '();' );
        // return self(); would always return Vehicle reg ardless

    }


    public function drive(){

        echo "I am a Vehicle!";

    }

}

class Bus extends Vehicle {

    public function drive(){

        parent::drive();

        echo "\nSpecifically, a bus!";

    }

}


class Car extends Vehicle {

    public function drive(){

        parent::drive();

        echo "\nSpecifically, a car!";

    }

}

// Drive a car
    Car::create()->drive();

// Drive a bus
    Bus::create()->drive();

I've implemented a factory "create" method in the Vehicle class that allows me to get an instance of the class that I want to use.

I tried using "return new self();" but that always returns an instance of Vehicle, so I resorted to using eval.

question: Is there a non-eval way to implement the create() method so that:

  • it returns an instance of the class you're using
  • it doesn't require implementing create() on each of the extending classes
share|improve this question
    
Is there something stopping you from making your Factory abstract, and passing its create method a string that represents the concrete class you want to instantiate? VehicleFactory::create("bus"); is a little longer to write, but has the benefit of being a bit more clear. –  KevinM1 Oct 19 '12 at 21:07
    
I'm just following the convention of other classes in my system that allow for things like: Bus::create()->setSpeed(10)->drive(); I think it's easy to read and doesn't require the creation of factory classes. It works great on non-extended classes. –  thatjuan Oct 19 '12 at 21:11
    
You should still be able to chain through a factory, though, as it returns an object. Maybe reflection could work, if you feel uneasy about eval(). –  KevinM1 Oct 19 '12 at 21:15
    
Right.. a factory would allow chaining, but would still require creating an additional factory class. Reflection is a good idea :) –  thatjuan Oct 19 '12 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use static instead of self, e.g.

<?php
class Vehicle {
    public static function create(){
        return new static();
    }

    public function drive(){
        echo "I am a Vehicle!";
    }
}

class Bus extends Vehicle {
    public function drive(){
        parent::drive();
        echo "\nSpecifically, a bus!";

    }
}

$b = Bus::create();
$b->drive();

prints

I am a Vehicle!
Specifically, a bus!
share|improve this answer
    
I could have sworn I tried this. Thank you sir! –  thatjuan Oct 19 '12 at 21:23

(VolkerK beat me, but this has a slight variation)

Wait, why do you need to eval() at all? Wouldn't:

public static function create() {
    $class = get_called_class();

    return new $class();
}

work?

share|improve this answer
1  
return new $class(); :) works too. Man I must be drunk –  thatjuan Oct 19 '12 at 21:25
    
Hehe, we've all been there. Happy you have the solution (even if the ideal one isn't mine). :) –  KevinM1 Oct 19 '12 at 21:27

The best way is to move the factory method out of the concrete type and into a factory class of it's own. You can then not only handle this more easily but you can also replace the factory with another factory easily.

I assume you know how inheritance with objects work, so you don't have to deal with anything static which is less straight forward and starts to stand in someones way pretty fast.

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