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given the following code:

vars = instance_variables.map(&method(:instance_variable_get))
vars.each {|v| v = 123}

would that set @something = 123?

taking it a step further

is it the same if i have

vars = instance_variables.map(&method(:instance_variable_get))
vars.each {|v| doSomething(v) }

def doSomething(var)
  var = 123
end

how would i mutate var from inside a function?

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Can you clarify what you're wanting to achieve, it's generally bad practice to change the value of a parameter, and in many cases not easily possible without a bit of a hack. –  Kei Oct 19 '12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can test this in irb pretty quickly:

@something = 456
instance_variables
# => [:@something]
instance_variables.map(&method(:instance_variable_get)).each { |v| v = 123 }
@something
# => 456 (i.e. "didn't mutate @something")

def doSomething(var)
  var = 123
end
vars = instance_variables.map(&method(:instance_variable_get))
vars.each { |v| doSomething(v) }
@something
# => 456 (i.e. "didn't mutate @something")

Object#instance_variable_set, however, does change the value of @something:

@something = 456
instance_variables.each { |v| instance_variable_set(v, 123) }
@something
# => 123
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ok cool this is what i wanted to know i suppose. –  j_mcnally Oct 19 '12 at 21:34
    
but i'd also need to pass the key? for v and by key i mean instance var name? –  j_mcnally Oct 19 '12 at 21:34
    
Yeah, v in that last snippet is a symbol: :@something –  pje Oct 19 '12 at 21:35
    
To be precise, your approach still doesn't mutate the instance variable. It just sets it to a new value. When you say "mutate", generally people mean to change some aspect of an existing object without assigning a new one, i.e by preserving the object_id of the referenced object. –  Holger Just Oct 20 '12 at 7:47
    
@HolgerJust: Really good point! Edited the answer to be more precise. –  pje Oct 20 '12 at 21:06

Agreeing with pje, you probably should have tested this in irb, but I'm assuming you want to capture a setter for every instance variable, so I'd recommend something like:

setters = instance_variables.map{|v| lambda { |val| instance_variable_set(v, val) }}

then you can just do setters[0].call(__VALUE__) and it will set the value accordingly.

What is it you are trying to achieve?

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it wasnt so much laziness, just curiousity of what the implications of why / how the pass through works etc. –  j_mcnally Oct 19 '12 at 21:42
    
i didn't really know about the mutations / instance_variable_set etc. I'll update my question to reflect more of that request for knowledge. –  j_mcnally Oct 19 '12 at 21:43

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