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The new Form1() part of this code (this code is in my Main.cs) keeps giving me this error - HomeInventory2.Form1 does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments.

private void cDsToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var form = new Form1();
    // show the form
    form.Show();
}

The Form1 code is as follows

namespace HomeInventory2
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {

        public Form1(IEnumerable<string> prepopulated)
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            IEnumerable<String> lines = prepopulated;
            textBoxAmount.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(0);
            textBoxCategories.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(1);
            textBoxProperties.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(2);
            textBoxValue.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(3);
        }

        private void label1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

        }

        private void submitButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            CreateInventory create = new CreateInventory();
            create.ItemAmount = textBoxAmount.Text;
            create.ItemCategory = textBoxCategories.Text;
            create.ItemProperties = textBoxValue.Text;
            create.ItemValue = textBoxValue.Text;

            InventoryMngr invtryMngr = new InventoryMngr();
            invtryMngr.Create(create);

        }
    }
}

I tried just putting a blank constructor in there - but then of course when that button or menu item is called it just brings up a blank screen.

share|improve this question
1  
What does it have to do without any data? –  Styxxy Oct 19 '12 at 22:02
2  
Just add a empty Form1() constructor that inits with default values, i.e. same code as existing, just come up with sensible defaults. You can even factor the logic out to a function and call it from both constructors. –  Ryan Oct 19 '12 at 22:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

All classes in .net have default constructors which don't take any arguments. When you are implementing your own constructor then the framework doesn't generate that empty constructor for your class. Same thing is happening here. in you cDsToolStripMenuItem_Click method you need to pass IEnumerable<string> parameter.

share|improve this answer

try adding a constructor that takes no arguments like this

namespace HomeInventory2
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {

        public Form1(IEnumerable<string> prepopulated)
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            IEnumerable<String> lines = prepopulated;
            textBoxAmount.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(0);
            textBoxCategories.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(1);
            textBoxProperties.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(2);
            textBoxValue.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(3);
        }

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            IEnumerable<String> lines = null;
            textBoxAmount.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(0);
            textBoxCategories.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(1);
            textBoxProperties.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(2);
            textBoxValue.Text = lines.ElementAtOrDefault(3);
        }

        private void label1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

        }

        private void submitButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            CreateInventory create = new CreateInventory();
            create.ItemAmount = textBoxAmount.Text;
            create.ItemCategory = textBoxCategories.Text;
            create.ItemProperties = textBoxValue.Text;
            create.ItemValue = textBoxValue.Text;

            InventoryMngr invtryMngr = new InventoryMngr();
            invtryMngr.Create(create);

        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 I was going to anonymously sockpuppet this answer but then you went and called a method on null. I can't in good conscience support that. –  Kevin Stricker Oct 21 '12 at 23:36
    
Hey, I demonstrated how to mock up the constructor, but left it so he would see that there was some issue there. I wasn't going to go and create a new IEnumerable<string> and wasn't going to change all his logic ... Also, those are linq methods, they're designed to work with nulls ;-) –  jcolebrand Oct 22 '12 at 15:38
    
Oops, my bad :P Of course, trying to create a new IEnumerable<string> definitely wouldn't work. –  Kevin Stricker Oct 22 '12 at 15:42

Look at the constructor for Form1:

public Form1(IEnumerable<string> prepopulated)

It's asking for a value of type IEnumerable<string> which you have to provide when you instatiate the form. Like this

IEnumerable<string> someValue;
.
.
// Actually assign a value to someValue
.
.
var form = new Form1(someValue);

You can also add a paremeterless constructor.

public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();            
        }

The call to InitializeComponent() is used to basically populate your form with all controls and handlers.

share|improve this answer

You should change your code to supplier a param:

private void cDsToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string[] prepopulated= ...;
    var form = new Form1(prepopulated);
    // show the form
    form.Show();
}

Either that or create a constructor without parameters.

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
}
share|improve this answer

You'll have to provide the IEnumerable<string> prepopulated input:

make new Form1(null) or new From1(new List{"a","b"})

share|improve this answer

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