Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two history tables that track changes in database values, using a revision id to track the individual changes. e.g.

Table 1:

 rev |  A   |  B 
=================
 1   |  100 | 'A'
 4   |  150 | 'A'
 7   |  100 | 'Z'

Table 2:

 rev |  C   |  D 
==================
 1   |  200 | True
 5   |    0 | True
 8   |    0 | False

The goal would be to merge the two tables into:

 rev |  A   |  B  |  C  |  D 
===============================
 1   |  100 | 'A' | 200 | True
 4   |  150 | 'A' | 200 | True
 5   |  150 | 'A' |   0 | True
 7   |  100 | 'Z' |   0 | True
 8   |  100 | 'Z' |   0 | False

The idea being that for for a given revision, I would take the values corresponding to that revision or the highest revision less than it.

The SQL query that comes to mind would be something akin to cross joining the two tables with constraint rev1 < rev2, then selecting rows using a subquery where rev1 = max(rev1) for each given rev2; unioning this query with its counterpart exchanging rev2 and rev1; and finally filtering out duplicates from where rev1 = rev2.

The questions are:

  • Is there a name for this type of join?
  • Is there an idiom for performing this type of join in SQL, or would it be better to do it programmatically (which would definitely be much simpler and possibly more efficient)?
share|improve this question
    
What RDBMS? Some have support for these types of operations, so (especially if data space is large) this may actually be more efficient in the database. –  Clockwork-Muse Oct 19 '12 at 22:39
    
So you do not want the query but just the answer to those two questions? –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 19 '12 at 22:42
    
The database is PostgreSQL, although technically the work is supposed to be independent of the DB (realistically this isn't going to happen). And yeah, just interested in the answers to the questions, unless there's a much simpler query that I'm overlooking. –  Nan L Oct 20 '12 at 17:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

SQL Fiddle

select
    coalesce(t1.rev, t2.rev) rev,
    coalesce(a, lag(a, 1) over(order by coalesce(t2.rev, t1.rev))) a,
    coalesce(b, lag(b, 1) over(order by coalesce(t2.rev, t1.rev))) b,
    coalesce(c, lag(c, 1) over(order by coalesce(t1.rev, t2.rev))) c,
    coalesce(d, lag(d, 1) over(order by coalesce(t1.rev, t2.rev))) d
from
    t1
    full join
    t2 on t1.rev = t2.rev
order by rev
share|improve this answer

This can be achieved by sub queries

SELECT ISNULL(Table1.rev,Table2.rev) AS rev
,ISNULL(A,(SELECT TOP 1 A FROM Table1 AS T1 WHERE ISNULL(Table1.rev,Table2.rev) > T1.rev AND A IS NOT NULL ORDER BY rev DESC)) AS A
,ISNULL(B,(SELECT TOP 1 B FROM Table1 AS T1 WHERE ISNULL(Table1.rev,Table2.rev) > T1.rev AND B IS NOT NULL ORDER BY rev DESC)) AS B
,ISNULL(C,(SELECT TOP 1 C FROM Table2 AS T2 WHERE ISNULL(Table1.rev,Table2.rev) > T2.rev AND C IS NOT NULL ORDER BY rev DESC)) AS C
,ISNULL(D,(SELECT TOP 1 D FROM Table2 AS T2 WHERE ISNULL(Table1.rev,Table2.rev) > T2.rev AND D IS NOT NULL ORDER BY rev DESC)) AS D
FROM Table1
FULL OUTER JOIN Table2
ON Table1.rev = Table2.rev
share|improve this answer
    
isnull is not valid postgresql syntax –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 25 '12 at 19:38

There's no specific join type to handle that sort of query. You have to do it either as a complex query or programmatically. Below is an example of PL/PGSQL code for this problem, using your example data.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION getRev(OUT rev INT, OUT A INT, OUT B CHAR, OUT C INT, OUT D BOOL) RETURNS SETOF record STABLE AS
$BODY$
DECLARE
    c1 SCROLL CURSOR FOR SELECT * FROM Table1 ORDER BY rev;
    c2 SCROLL CURSOR FOR SELECT * FROM Table2 ORDER BY rev;
    r1    Table1%ROWTYPE;
    r1c   Table1%ROWTYPE;
    r2    Table2%ROWTYPE;
    r2c   Table2%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
  OPEN c1;
  OPEN c2;
  FETCH c1 INTO r1;
  FETCH c2 INTO r2;
  r1c := r1;
  r2c := r2;
  WHILE r1 IS NOT NULL AND r2 IS NOT NULL
  LOOP
    CASE 
    WHEN r1.rev = r2.rev THEN 
      rev := r1.rev;
      A := r1.a;
      B := r1.b;
      C := r2.c;
      D := r2.d;
      FETCH c1 INTO r1c;
      FETCH c2 INTO r2c;
      CASE 
        WHEN r1c.rev = r2c.rev THEN
      r1 := r1c;
      r2 := r2c;
        WHEN r1c.rev < r2c.rev THEN
          r1 := r1c;
      FETCH PRIOR FROM c2 INTO r2c;
    ELSE
          r2 := r2c;
      FETCH PRIOR FROM c1 INTO r1c;
      END CASE;
    WHEN r1.rev < r2.rev THEN
      WHILE r1c IS NOT NULL AND r1c.rev < r2.rev LOOP
         r1 := r1c;
         FETCH c1 INTO r1c;
      END LOOP;
      rev := r2.rev;
      A := r1.a;
      B := r1.b;
      C := r2.c;
      D := r2.d;
      r1 := r1c;
    ELSE 
      WHILE r2c IS NOT NULL AND r2c.rev < r1.rev LOOP
         r2 := r2c;
         FETCH c2 INTO r2c;
      END LOOP;
      rev := r1.rev;
      A := r1.a;
      B := r1.b;
      C := r2.c;
      D := r2.d;
      r2 := r2c;
    END CASE;
    RETURN NEXT;
  END LOOP;
  CLOSE c1;
  CLOSE c2;
  RETURN;
END
$BODY$
LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';

This should run in O(length(Table1) + length(Table2)).

Note the tricky part in the "CASE WHEN r1.rev = r2.rev" : we have to choose on which table we continue the scan for the next iteration. The correct one is the one with the smallest rev value after the cursor, to get through all the rev numbers available in both tables. You could certainly get better performance by coding it in C or C++.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.