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I'm looking at a java hangman game here: https://github.com/leleah/EvilHangman/blob/master/EvilHangman.java

The code in particular is this:

Iterator<Entry<List<Integer>, Set<String>>> k = partitions.entrySet().iterator();
while (k.hasNext())
{
    Entry<?, ?> pair = (Entry<?, ?>)k.next();
    int sizeOfSet = ((Set<String>)pair.getValue()).size();
    if (sizeOfSet > biggestPartitionSize)
    {
        biggestPartitionSize = sizeOfSet;
    }
}

Now my question. My google foo is weak I guess, I cannot find much on Entry sets other than the java doc itself. Is is just a temporary copy of the map? And I cannot find any info at all on the syntax:

Entry<?, ?>

Can anyone explain or point me toward an explanation of what is going on with those question marks? Thanks in advanced.

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It's not a temporary copy of the map, it's just a way of walking through the map and getting the key/value pairs together rather than iterating through the keys and getting the corresponding values. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 19 '12 at 22:50
    
ok that makes sense. Thank you. Still curious about those '?'s though :) –  Jake Sellers Oct 19 '12 at 22:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An entrySet is the set of all Entries in a Map - i.e. the set of all key,value pairs in the Map. Because a Map consists of key,value pairs, if you want to iterate over it you need to specify whether you want to iterate over the keys, the values, or both (Entries).

The <?,?> indicates that the pair variable holds an Entry where the key and the value could be of any type. This would normally indicate that we don't care what types of values it holds. In your code this is not the case, because you need to cast the value to Set<String> so you can check its size.

You could also rewrite the code as follows, avoiding the cast to Set<String>

Iterator<Entry<List<Integer>, Set<String>>> k = partitions.entrySet().iterator();
while (k.hasNext())
{
Entry<?, Set<String>> pair = (Entry<?, Set<String>>)k.next();
int sizeOfSet = pair.getValue().size();
if (sizeOfSet > biggestPartitionSize)
{
     biggestPartitionSize = sizeOfSet;
}

When we need to be more specific about the types that the Entry holds, we can use the full type: Entry<List<Integer>, Set<String>>. This avoids the need to cast the key or value to a particular type (and the risk of casting to the wrong type).

You can also specify just the type of the key, or the value, as shown in my example above.

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You can find information about Entry in the Javadoc: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Map.Entry.html

The <?, ?> part is because Entry is a generic interface.

More info on ? here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/wildcards.html

That being said, the usage in this example is not very nice. A cleaner way of getting sizeOfSet:

int sizeOfSet = k.next().getValue().size();
share|improve this answer

You aren't supposed to know much about the entrySet() function returns. All you are allowed to depend on is that it is a Set<Map.Entry<x,y>>. It might be a rather special (*) copy, but it's more likely to be an object that provides a view of the innards of the original Map.

In modern Java, this sort of thing get commonly written as:

for (Map.Entry<X, Y> me : map.entrySet()) {
   // code that looks at me.xxx() here
}

In your example, X,Y is List<Integer>, Set<String>.

(*) The documentation says, 'The set is backed by the map, so changes to the map are reflected in the set, and vice-versa.'

Thanks to @Miserable Variable.

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1  
It is not entire true that you aren't supposed to know. The documentation says The set is backed by the map, so changes to the map are reflected in the set, and vice-versa. –  Miserable Variable Oct 19 '12 at 23:11
1  
Fair enough ... –  bmargulies Oct 19 '12 at 23:12
Entry<?, ?> 

Can anyone explain or point me toward an explanation of what is going on with those question marks?

I could be wrong but I think the programmer is trying to be lazy. It should have been

Entry<List<Integer>, Set<String>>> 

then none of the casts would have been required

ALSO:

My google foo is weak I guess, I cannot find much on Entry sets other than the java doc itself. Is is just a temporary copy of the map?

Javadoc has everything you need (emphasis mine):

  • Returns a Set view of the mappings contained in this map. The set is backed by the map, so changes to the map are reflected in the set, and vice-versa.
  • If the map is modified while an iteration over the set is in progress (except through the iterator's own remove operation, or through the setValue operation on a map entry returned by the iterator) the results of the iteration are undefined.
  • The set supports element removal, which removes the corresponding mapping from the map, via the Iterator.remove, Set.remove, removeAll, retainAll and clear operations.
  • It does not support the add or addAll operations.

What more information are you looking for?

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