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I have a list of lists defined by integer:

val ex: List[List[Int]] = List(List (1, 2, 3), List(4, 5, 6), List(7, 8 , 9), ex)

How can I multiply all the elements of the list of lists by two using circular definition in scala?

Edit: A circular definition of an entity X is a definition that effectively uses X to set himself X.

Example:

val ex1: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1,2,3), <call ex1 to multiply the elements by two>)

The example will create a list of lists infinite. I apologize for not having clarified earlier.

Thank you!

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what is circular definition? –  om-nom-nom Oct 19 '12 at 23:36
    
See the edited post, I'm sorry –  James Far Oct 20 '12 at 0:07
1  
I still do not understand. Please give the input and the expected output. I don't know what is a "list of lists infinite" –  Sebastien Lorber Oct 20 '12 at 0:15
    
i would guess he means recursion –  Arjan Oct 20 '12 at 8:46
    
James, none of the answers was marked correct -- did they all miss the mark? –  AmigoNico Apr 20 '13 at 23:50

3 Answers 3

I'm not sure, but I think you might be looking for Streams, which are like lazily defined Lists, and that definition can be recursive. Does this look like what you want?

scala> val ex:Stream[List[Int]] = List(1,2,3) #:: ex.map( _ map (_*2) )
ex: Stream[List[Int]] = Stream(List(1, 2, 3), ?)

scala> ( ex take 5 ) foreach println
List(1, 2, 3)
List(2, 4, 6)
List(4, 8, 12)
List(8, 16, 24)
List(16, 32, 48)

or perhaps

scala> val ex:Stream[List[Int]] = List(1,2,3) #:: ex.map( _ map (_+3) )
ex: Stream[List[Int]] = Stream(List(1, 2, 3), ?)

scala> ( ex take 5 ) foreach println
List(1, 2, 3)
List(4, 5, 6)
List(7, 8, 9)
List(10, 11, 12)
List(13, 14, 15)
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, now I see that Luigi had given a two-part answer, and the second part was about Streams. I'll leave mine, though, because we interpreted the problem differently, so our solutions are different. –  AmigoNico Oct 20 '12 at 5:16
    
val ex should be def ex to avoid circular reference –  Guillaume Massé Nov 3 '12 at 19:45
    
it's a compile error scalakata.com/5095b810e4b093f3524f3435 At least in the presentation compiler. –  Guillaume Massé Nov 4 '12 at 0:34
1  
Guillaume, your question forced me to do some research; I wrote up the question and answer here. –  AmigoNico Nov 4 '12 at 8:51

If I interpret your question correctly, you want to do this:

val ex: List[List[Int]] = {
  val ex = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5, 6), List(7, 8, 9))
  ex ++ ex
}

This isn't a circular definition because the inner ex is just shadowing the outer one (and it's clearer if you use a different variable name).

If you actually want a recursive definition, you need to use a lazy data structure such as Stream (you can try it with List, but you'll get a NullPointerException). So you can write this:

val ex: Stream[List[Int]] = 
  Stream(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5, 6), List(7, 8, 9)) #::: (ex take 3)

ex.toList // if it actually needs to be a List, which is probably doesn't

#::: is the lazy Stream equivalent of ::: on List.

If you append ex rather than ex take 3 then ex will be infinite, and you can get your list with (ex take 6).toList.

edit: after reading @AmigoNico's interpretation of your question (which is probably the correct interpretation - but who knows!), you can also do this using the iterate function, e.g.

List.iterate(List(1,2,3), 3)(_ map (_ * 2))
  // List(List(1, 2, 3), List(2, 4, 6), List(4, 8, 12))

// or if you want it infinte:
val xs = Stream.iterate(List(1,2,3))(_ map (_ * 2))
(xs take 3).toList
  // result same as above
share|improve this answer
  1. You can't have an infinite List because it is not a lazy data structure in Scala and you'll inevitably run out of memory. But Scala has a lazy structure - Stream
  2. What you're looking for is an iterate function. It is missing in the standard library, so here's an implementation inspired by Haskell (assuming you're using Scala 2.10):

    implicit class AnyFunctional [ A ] ( val a : A ) extends AnyVal {
      def iterate ( f : A => A ) : Stream[A] = a #:: (f(a) iterate f)
    }
    

    Having it in scope you'll be able to use it like that:

    scala> List(1,2,3) iterate (_.map(_*2)) take 3 toList
    warning: there were 1 feature warnings; re-run with -feature for details
    res7: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(2, 4, 6), List(4, 8, 12))
    
share|improve this answer
    
See the edited post, I'm sorry. –  James Far Oct 20 '12 at 0:07
    
@JamesFar see the updates –  Nikita Volkov Oct 20 '12 at 10:01

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