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Here are two sqlite queries:

SELECT * FROM items JOIN licenses ON items.id=licenses.id OR items.type=licenses.type;

This query doesn't use OR, it uses UNION

SELECT * FROM items JOIN licenses ON items.id=licenses.id UNION SELECT * FROM items JOIN licenses ON items.type=licenses.type;

Assuming I have an index in the licenses table on id and an index in the licenses table on type shouldn't the first query that uses an OR be only a tiny bit slower?

I am seeing that the first query is approximately 20 times slower than the second query in Sqlite, what is the cause for that?

I would expect the internal plan to look something like this for the first query:

  • For each row in the items table:
  • Take the value from the id column of the items table and use it to lookup all rows in the licenses table with that id, call that set of matching rows A.
  • Take the value from the type column of the items table and use it to lookup all rows in the licenses table with that type, call that set of matching rows A'. Combine A and A' and eliminate any duplicate rows. Add the result in the list of result rows
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I'm no expert, but I think you have correctly guessed how SQLite is handling the first query. So how is the second query so much faster? Probably like this: if the columns you're matching on are all indexed, then for each of the two subSELECTs in the second query, SQLite can do a trick like this (using the join on id as an example): first order both tables by id (zero cost because there are indexes), then start at the top of each table, compare, if items.id is smaller, advance down the items table, if licenses.id is smaller, advance down the licenses table, if they match, add them to result. –  Mark Amery Oct 20 '12 at 1:09
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This means that for each of the two subselects in the second query, the total number of comparisons required to generate the result table is bounded above by the sum of the number of rows in the two tables. On the other hand, in your pseudoplan for the first query, we have this mysterious 'lookup all rows in the licenses table with that id' instruction, which is probably going to get handled by a binary search on the id column's index in the licenses table. Then the same thing for the type column. Suddenly the number of comparisons needed is scaling substantially worse the linearly! –  Mark Amery Oct 20 '12 at 1:13
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By the way, this sort of nonsense where two queries that a human can trivially see are equivalent nonetheless have hugely different performance is REALLY REALLY common in SQL. I don't know how clever or stupid SQLite's query planner is, but I've had to deal with this kind of problem multiple times with PostgreSQL. –  Mark Amery Oct 20 '12 at 1:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For doing joins, SQLite supports only nested loop joins on two tables (which can be optimized with indexes). As explained in The SQLite Query Planner and Query Planning, doing joins with two tables at once is not one of the supported optimizations.

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