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I have a struct The_Word that has a variable char word[WORD_LENGTH]

I have the following

typedef struct The_Word
{
    char word[WORD_LENGTH];
    int frequency;
    struct The_Word* next;
} The_Word;

int someFunc(char* word)
{
/*Rest of method excluded*/

struct The_Word *newWord = malloc(sizeof(struct The_Word));

newWord->word = word; // error here. How can I assign the struct's word to the pointer word
}
share|improve this question

You need to use strncpy to copy an string:

#include <string.h>

int someFunc(char* word)
{
  /*Rest of method excluded*/

  struct The_Word *newWord = malloc(sizeof(struct The_Word));
  strncpy(newWord->word, word, WORD_LENGTH);
  newWord->word[WORD_LENGTH - 1] = '\0';
}

You should be careful to check if the string fits in the array. That's it, when the length of the parameter char* word is longer than WORD_LENGTH.

share|improve this answer
    
what if WORD_LENGTH > strlen(word)? – Aniket Oct 20 '12 at 2:05
    
@PrototypeStark that's what the line newWord->word[WORD_LENGTH - 1] = '\0'; is for. – vz0 Oct 20 '12 at 2:06
    
no i mean, "word" is 10 characters long(+1 '\0') and WORD_LENGTH = 100? Wouldn't it be a waste of time executing 90 copies? – Aniket Oct 20 '12 at 2:07
    
@PrototypeStark The function strncpy copies at most n bytes. In your example, the function copies just the first 11 characters. – vz0 Oct 20 '12 at 2:11
    
@PrototypeStark my bad, you are correct, strncpy pads with null bytes. However, calling strlen(word) does also cost time. If the length of the string is on average longer than WORD_LENGTH / 2 then is better to use WORD_LENGTH instead of strlen(word). – vz0 Oct 20 '12 at 2:14

You don't assign pointers directly. Instead you should use strncpy() function.

strncpy(newWord->word,word,strlen(word));

strcpy(), memcpy() all work similarly.

typedef struct The_Word
{
    char word[WORD_LENGTH];
    int frequency;
    struct The_Word* next;
} The_Word;

int someFunc(char* word)
{
/*Rest of method excluded*/

  struct The_Word *newWord = malloc(sizeof(struct The_Word));
  memset(newWord->word,0,WORD_LENGTH);
  strcpy(newWord->word,word);
  /*return something*/
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, why can't I use strcpy(newWord->word,word)? – user1738539 Oct 20 '12 at 2:06
    
You can. @user1738539. I like strncpy() more is all. strcpy() is also valid there. – Aniket Oct 20 '12 at 2:08
    
You should always check if there is enough space in the array to store the string. – vz0 Oct 20 '12 at 2:17
    
The strncpy() function does not guarantee that the result string is null terminated. Also, if you copy a 5 byte word into a 20 KiB buffer, strncpy() will carefully zero out the remaining 20475 bytes of memory (where strcpy() would stop after the sixth byte). There's a case for saying "if you can't safely use memmove() to copy the string, you can't safely use strcpy() or strncpuy() either". – Jonathan Leffler Oct 20 '12 at 4:00

This gives an incompatible types error because in C arrays are treated as constant pointers. Arrays and pointers are not exactly the same thing. Although they behave identically in most other circumstances, you cannot reassign what an array points to.

It looks like you intend to copy the string from the function argument into the newly allocated struct. If this is the case use strncpy() or memcpy() as others have suggested.

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