Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using SQL Server to build stored procedures, and I'm using cursors to loop through a select statement

I'm defining the cursor as follow:

DECLARE @c_col1 varchar(max);
DECLARE @c_col2 varchar(max);

DECLARE c as CURSOR FOR 
SELECT col1, col2 
FROM table;

OPEN c;
FETCH NEXT FROM c INTO
@c_col1, @c_col2;

SELECT @c_col1, @c_col2;

Is there a way to access the columns of the cursor without a need to declare variables for each column and to use INTO in FETCH clause? In other words, is it possible to use:

DECLARE c as CURSOR FOR 
SELECT col1, col2 
FROM table;

OPEN c;
FETCH NEXT FROM c; 

SELECT c.col1, c.col2;
share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to use cursors? You should really try and find a set based alternative using SQL as this is what databases are good at processing. Often cursor code is much much slower than the equivalent SQL. –  pjp Aug 19 '09 at 8:27
1  
@pjp, sometimes cursors are useful to run some complex logic on a row-by-row basis, often by calling a stored procedure for each row returned. Also, if you need to do something like delete a few million rows, a single set-based query can lock up your database for a long time. Deleting one row at a time with a cursor takes a lot longer but allows the database to breathe while it's happening. –  Eric Z Beard Aug 19 '09 at 10:11
    
you can loop and process data, without a cursor. You can get massive performance improvements replacing cursors with set based operations. However, I have replaced the use of cursors, but still looped (because it was really necessary) and have still seen big performance gains. –  KM. Aug 19 '09 at 11:52
    
I'm not sure what you are after, but your code is not typical, and you certainly do not have to do it that way, as the selected answer says. –  KM. Aug 21 '09 at 12:50
    
@Eric Z Beard, this exactly when I would never use a cursor. I'd process in batches using a while loop. Much faster to delete 10000 records at a time in a loop than run row-by-agonizing-row in a cursor. –  HLGEM Nov 22 '10 at 18:42
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, you have to do it that way if you want to store the values from the cursor in local variables instead of returning them back to the client.

share|improve this answer
    
from the OP's code, they are returning the values as a 1 row reslt set of two columns –  KM. Aug 19 '09 at 12:15
add comment

if this is your entire porcedure (right from OP question):

DECLARE @c_col1 varchar(max);
DECLARE @c_col2 varchar(max);

DECLARE c as CURSOR FOR 
SELECT col1, col2 
FROM table;

OPEN c;
FETCH NEXT FROM c INTO
@c_col1, @c_col2;

SELECT @c_col1, @c_col2;

then you can just do the following to return a result set of the two columns, no cursor necessary:

SELECT top 1 col1, col2 
FROM table;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.