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Hi I am making changes to some file in my local git repository and then want to send the changes to the remote git repository from which the local was cloned via ssh.

After run "git commit -a" on my local side, to send the changes to the remote, I run

$ git push
Everything up-to-date

However I checked the remote files and they are not changed! Any idea?

Thanks and regards!

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You probably pushed into a non-bare repository, i.e. a repository that has a working copy attached to it. You shouldn’t have ignored the warning git push gives you if it notices that this is the case.

Anyway, log in to the remote machine, change to the repository and do

git checkout <whatever branch you’re on>

There you go. Next time only push into bare repositories. :)

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I managed to solve this problem as what you said but I am still confused and not understand what I was doing. Does non-bare means that I can edit files in the repository directly and bare means that the files in the repository does not allow to be edited? What kind of warning git push gives, which I didn't notice? Thanks! –  Tim Aug 19 '09 at 13:55
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A “bare” repository is a repository that does not have a working copy, i.e. you can not edit any files in it. The repository path directly contains everything that is normally in the .git folder of a non-bare repository, and in fact a bare repository is only this folder. When pushing to a non-bare repository you do not change the files that are currently checked out. You need to update the working code separately, e.g. with git checkout or git reset. –  Bombe Aug 19 '09 at 14:22
    
So you have to switch to a branch that isn't being worked on in order to push to it? –  omouse Apr 25 '11 at 17:15
    
Just don’t push into a repository that has a working tree attached. The warning is there for a reason! If you do not understand the ramifications of pushing into a non-bare repository, then don’t do it. Don’t look for workarounds but use a sensible structure instead: push to a bare repository somewhere else and then pull from your destination. –  Bombe Apr 29 '11 at 7:08
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have you tried the following?

 $ git push origin master:master
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It doesn't work. :( What is this supposed to do? –  Tim Aug 19 '09 at 13:35
    
push your local changes on master to origin's branch master –  knittl Aug 19 '09 at 14:29
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I suggest you look into using gitosis for hosting those git bare repositories. It's really easy to use after the initial setup.

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type "git log" in your remote repository to see if it contains the newest commit. If not, you should check the configuration of you local repository to see the remote settings.

To see the changes in different type of your remote repository:

A. If your remote repository is bare, you can find the files in the remote repository branches/ config description HEAD hooks/ info/ objects/ refs/

after new commit is pushed, files in objects/ directory would changed.

B. If your remote repository is non-bare, type "git checkout master" And "git status" in your remote repository to see the file status. See if some file has been modified or deleted.

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