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If I run the following code, I get different addresses printed. Why?

class Base1 {
    int x;
};

class Base2 {
    int y;
};

class Derived : public Base1, public Base2 {

};

union U {
    Base2* b;
    Derived* d;
    U(Base2* b2) : b(b) {}
};

int main()
{
    Derived* d = new Derived;

    cout << d << "\n";
    cout << U(d).d << "\n";

    return 0;
}

Even more fun is if you repeatedly go in and out of the union the address keeps incrementing by 4, like this

int main()
{
    Derived* d = new Derived;

    cout << d << "\n";
    d = U(d).d;
    cout << d << "\n";
    d = U(d).d;
    cout << d << "\n";

    return 0;
}

If the union is modified like this, then the problem goes away

union U {
    void* v;
    Base2* b;
    Derived* d;
    U(void* v) : v(v) {}
};

Also, if either base class is made empty, the problem goes away. Is this a compiler bug? I want it to leave my pointers the hell alone.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I run the following code, I get different addresses printed. Why?

Because the Base2 sub-object of the Derived object isn't at the start of the Derived object. So the addresses are different. When the compiler performs an implicit cast from a Derived* to a Base2*, it needs to adjust the address.

Given the definitions of the Base1 and Base2 classes, both sub-objects of the Derived class cannot possibly be at the starting address of a Derived object - there's no room at that address for both sub-objects.

Say you had this code:

Derived* d = new Derived;

Base1* pb1 = d;
Base2* pb2 = d;

How would it be possible for pb1 and pb2 to point to the same address? pb1 has to point to a Base1::x item, and pb2 has to point to a Base2::y item (and those items have to be distinct).

Even more fun is if you repeatedly go in and out of the union the address keeps incrementing by 4

Because you're reading from the union's d member after writing the b member, which is undefined behavior (you're essentially performing something like a reinterpret_cast<Derived*>() on a Base2*).

I want it to leave my pointers the hell alone.

Not if you want a Base2* pointer. Multiple inheritance makes things more complex - that's why many people suggest avoiding it unless absolutely necessary.

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Not using multiple inheritance will not make this problem go away; if the Base class has no virtual functions, and you introduce them in the Derived class, the same thing will happen. More importantly, this is undefined behavior, and that's the end of the story... –  enobayram Oct 20 '12 at 5:15
    
Ok, I don't want to get the Base2 pointer back from the union, so the problem is in the union constructor because I'm initializing a Base2 pointer, it gets adjusted. If I use a void* pointer then it just forces the compiler to keep the address I give it. –  Bob Oct 20 '12 at 5:30

The union constructor never initializes member d

The union constructor has a bug, where instead of initializing member b with parameter b2, it initializes b with itself

// b(b) should probably be b(b2)
U(Base2* b2) : b(b) {}

When your first main function example attempts to construct an instance of U, and print member d, it's actually printing an undefined value, because member d hasn't been initialized, and isn't guaranteed to be accessible.

// U(d) doesn't construct member d, so .d returns an undefined value
cout << U(d).d << "\n";

Regarding your second main function example

// d is set to a newly constructed instance of Derived
Derived* d = new Derived;

// current address of d is printed
cout << d << "\n";

// a new instance of U is constructed. The address of member d will be in close
// proximity to the newly initialized U instance, and is what will be printed
d = U(d).d;
cout << d << "\n";

// yet another new instance of U is constructed, and again, the address of member
// d will be in close proximity to the newly initialized U instance, and is
//what will be printed
d = U(d).d;
cout << d << "\n";
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