Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just found it in dotPeek, String.cs:

[ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.MayFail)]
[__DynamicallyInvokable]
public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
  if (this == null)
    throw new NullReferenceException();
  string strB = obj as string;
  if (strB == null)
    return false;
  if (object.ReferenceEquals((object) this, obj))
    return true;
  if (this.Length != strB.Length)
    return false;
  else
    return string.EqualsHelper(this, strB);
}

At the second line a NullReferenceException is thrown if this == null. So how does it possible to call method of null object?

MSDN says: Note that applications throw the ArgumentNullException exception rather than the NullReferenceException exception discussed here.

The following Microsoft intermediate language (MSIL) instructions throw NullReferenceException:

callvirt
cpblk
cpobj
initblk
ldelem.<type>
ldelema
ldfld
ldflda
ldind.<type>
ldlen
stelem.<type>
stfld
stind.<type>
throw
unbox

If I get it, exception is thrown before the entry into the method body. Right? So what is need to throw NullReferenceException from method? Does __DynamicallyInvokableAttribute force method to be called bypassing any checks? Or something else?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Check this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/10625326/… –  empi Oct 20 '12 at 6:46
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

C# does use callvirt where you get a NullReferenceException before entering the null object. But since the BCL is made for a plethora of languages they did guard against null objects in some central parts (such as string) which do use the call instruction.

Managed C++ is the most notable user of the call instruction.

This was done to aid debugging a bit (as far as I know) but it is not at all consistent throughout the BCL.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.