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I am trying to calculate the area of a graph using integrals.

The user is supposed to give me 3 numbers:

  • x1, x2 – the bounds of the integral
  • N is in how many pieces the program will divide the function

However, I keep getting wrong results.

The first difficulty that I faced is that range accepts only integers.

Also z=(x2-x1)/N if I try and make it a float, I can't make it a step after, and I don't make it float it approaches to zero so Python shows me an error that the step is zero.

Also how can I summarize (z*(f(i)+f(i+z)/2)?

Here is my code:

# -*- coding: UTF-8 -*-
import math

def f(x) :
    y = (-1/6.0)*(x-1)*(x-2)*(x+2)*(x-4)
    return y 
x1=int(raw_input ('Δωστε το χ1 οπου αρχιζει η μετρηση του ολοκληρωματος \n ')) #greek letters
x2=int(raw_input ('Δωστε χ2 οπου θελετε να ολοκληρωνεται η μετρηση \n '))
N=int(raw_input('Δωστε τον αριθμο n που θα ειναι το πληθος \n των τραπεζιων που θα χρησιμοπιουνται στη προσσεγγιση  \n '))
z=(x2-x1)/N
for i in range(x1,x2,z):
    z=float(z)
    x1=float(x1)
    x2=float(x2)
    print (z*(f(i)+f(i+z))/2) 
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • Let x1, x2 and therefore the step size z be floats.
  • Instead of a for-loop, a while-loop may be easier here.

x1 = float(raw_input ('Δωστε το χ1 οπου αρχιζει η μετρηση του ολοκληρωματος \n ')) #greek letters
x2 = float(raw_input ('Δωστε χ2 οπου θελετε να ολοκληρωνεται η μετρηση \n '))
N = int(raw_input('Δωστε τον αριθμο n που θα ειναι το πληθος \n των τραπεζιων που θα χρησιμοπιουνται στη προσσεγγιση  \n '))
z = (x2-x1)/N
x = x1
while x < x2:
    print (z*(f(x)+f(x+z))/2)
    x += z
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You are reading x1, you cast it to an int (read: throw away information), then you cast it back to a float upon each iteration. The lost information will not reappear.

z=(x2-x1)/N

Because your value are integers, it will perform an integer division, i.e. if N > (x2 - x1), z will be zero. And since you always want to choose a large N, z will always be zero.

Thus, range() cannot not work.

What you need to do instead is read the inputs as floats:

number = float(raw_input("Please enter a number: "))

Note that applying float() repeatedly doesn't do anything useful. Thus, this code is not necessary:

for ...
    z=float(z)
    x1=float(x1)
    x2=float(x2)

Also how can i summarise the (z*(f(i)+f(i+z)/2)?

You can't make it shorter, since f() isn't a linear function.


Another thing about range() is, that the step parameter must be an integer.

You can easily create your own range function though:

def frange(start, stop, steps):
    x = start
    difference = float(stop - start)
    for step in range(0, steps):
        next_x = start + difference * (1 + step) / steps
        yield x, next_x - x
        x = next_x

Working code

# -*- coding: UTF-8 -*-
import math

def f(x) :
    y = (-1/6.0)*(x-1)*(x-2)*(x+2)*(x-4)
    return y 
x1 = float(raw_input ('Δωστε το χ1 οπου αρχιζει η μετρηση του ολοκληρωματος \n ')) #greek letters
x2 = float(raw_input ('Δωστε χ2 οπου θελετε να ολοκληρωνεται η μετρηση \n '))
N = int(raw_input('Δωστε τον αριθμο n που θα ειναι το πληθος \n των τραπεζιων που θα χρησιμοπιουνται στη προσσεγγιση  \n '))
result = 0
for x, delta_x in frange(x1, x2, N):
    result += delta_x * (f(x)+f(x+delta_x)) / 2
print result 
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Writing a float implementation of range isn't a good idea, since floating-point errors mean that it's unpredictable whether (an approximation to) the stop endpoint gets included or not. For example, with your implementation, both len(list(frange(0, 1, 1/7.))) and len(list(frange(0, 1, 1/8.))) give 8 on my machine. Better to keep the int-based range and compute the current x from that. –  Mark Dickinson Oct 20 '12 at 16:01
    
@MarkDickinson That's a good point, but I'm not sure whether it is that relevant, after all, using 1/7th for the integration is too large a Δx anyway, and as Δx gets smaller, this possible off-by-one error should go away. Seeing that you are a mathematician, maybe you can give some less hand-wavy statement than me about the importance of that. But still, I'll implement that shortly. –  phant0m Oct 20 '12 at 16:17
    
I don't think the possibility for off-by-one error would go away: in fact, the more steps you use, the larger the expected accumulated error from the additions (one per step). Treating that error as roughly normally distributed (which may or may not be reasonable), I'd expect to get an extra unwanted point about half the time, for large number of steps. –  Mark Dickinson Oct 20 '12 at 16:22
    
Suggested replacement: use for i in range(N):, then x = x1 + i * delta_x before the sum += ... line. –  Mark Dickinson Oct 20 '12 at 16:24
    
@MarkDickinson But wouldn't the error still accumulate in that way? See my edit for an updated version. –  phant0m Oct 20 '12 at 16:39
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