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I am trying to convert an image into grayscale in the following way:

#define bytesPerPixel 4
#define bitsPerComponent 8

-(unsigned char*) getBytesForImage: (UIImage*)pImage
{
    CGImageRef image = [pImage CGImage];
    NSUInteger width = CGImageGetWidth(image);
    NSUInteger height = CGImageGetHeight(image);

    NSUInteger bytesPerRow = bytesPerPixel * width;

    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();
    unsigned char *rawData = malloc(height * width * 4);
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(rawData, width, height, bitsPerComponent, bytesPerRow, colorSpace, kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast | kCGBitmapByteOrder32Big);
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);

    CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0, 0, width, height), image);
    CGContextRelease(context);

    return rawData;
}

-(UIImage*) processImage: (UIImage*)pImage
{   
    DebugLog(@"processing image");
    unsigned char *rawData = [self getBytesForImage: pImage];

    NSUInteger width = pImage.size.width;
    NSUInteger height = pImage.size.height;

    DebugLog(@"width: %d", width);
    DebugLog(@"height: %d", height);

    NSUInteger bytesPerRow = bytesPerPixel * width;

    for (int xCoordinate = 0; xCoordinate < width; xCoordinate++)
    {
    	for (int yCoordinate = 0; yCoordinate < height; yCoordinate++)
    	{
    		int byteIndex = (bytesPerRow * yCoordinate) + xCoordinate * bytesPerPixel;

    		//Getting original colors
    		float red = ( rawData[byteIndex] / 255.f );
    		float green = ( rawData[byteIndex + 1] / 255.f );
    		float blue = ( rawData[byteIndex + 2] / 255.f );

    		//Processing pixel data
    		float averageColor = (red + green + blue) / 3.0f;

    		red = averageColor;
    		green = averageColor;
    		blue = averageColor;

    		//Assigning new color components
    		rawData[byteIndex] = (unsigned char) red * 255;
    		rawData[byteIndex + 1] = (unsigned char) green * 255;
    		rawData[byteIndex + 2] = (unsigned char) blue * 255;


    	}
    }

    NSData* newPixelData = [NSData dataWithBytes: rawData length: height * width * 4];
    UIImage* newImage = [UIImage imageWithData: newPixelData];

    free(rawData);

    DebugLog(@"image processed");

    return newImage;

}

So when I want to convert an image I just call processImage:

imageToDisplay.image = [self processImage: image];

But imageToDisplay doesn't display. What may be the problem?

Thanks.

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2  
Which cheeky monkey has added this to their favourites without upvoting it? totally blinding lack of generosity! –  P i Apr 30 '11 at 6:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

What exactly takes place when you use this function? Is the function returning an invalid image, or is the display not showing it correctly?

This is the method I use to convert to greyscale.

- (UIImage *) convertToGreyscale:(UIImage *)i {

    int kRed = 1;
    int kGreen = 2;
    int kBlue = 4;

    int colors = kGreen | kBlue | kRed;
    int m_width = i.size.width;
    int m_height = i.size.height;

    uint32_t *rgbImage = (uint32_t *) malloc(m_width * m_height * sizeof(uint32_t));
    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(rgbImage, m_width, m_height, 8, m_width * 4, colorSpace, kCGBitmapByteOrder32Little | kCGImageAlphaNoneSkipLast);
    CGContextSetInterpolationQuality(context, kCGInterpolationHigh);
    CGContextSetShouldAntialias(context, NO);
    CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0, 0, m_width, m_height), [i CGImage]);
    CGContextRelease(context);
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);

    // now convert to grayscale
    uint8_t *m_imageData = (uint8_t *) malloc(m_width * m_height);
    for(int y = 0; y < m_height; y++) {
        for(int x = 0; x < m_width; x++) {
            uint32_t rgbPixel=rgbImage[y*m_width+x];
            uint32_t sum=0,count=0;
            if (colors & kRed) {sum += (rgbPixel>>24)&255; count++;}
            if (colors & kGreen) {sum += (rgbPixel>>16)&255; count++;}
            if (colors & kBlue) {sum += (rgbPixel>>8)&255; count++;}
            m_imageData[y*m_width+x]=sum/count;
        }
    }
    free(rgbImage);

    // convert from a gray scale image back into a UIImage
    uint8_t *result = (uint8_t *) calloc(m_width * m_height *sizeof(uint32_t), 1);

    // process the image back to rgb
    for(int i = 0; i < m_height * m_width; i++) {
        result[i*4]=0;
        int val=m_imageData[i];
        result[i*4+1]=val;
        result[i*4+2]=val;
        result[i*4+3]=val;
    }

    // create a UIImage
    colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();
    context = CGBitmapContextCreate(result, m_width, m_height, 8, m_width * sizeof(uint32_t), colorSpace, kCGBitmapByteOrder32Little | kCGImageAlphaNoneSkipLast);
    CGImageRef image = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);
    CGContextRelease(context);
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);
    UIImage *resultUIImage = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:image];
    CGImageRelease(image);

    free(m_imageData);

    // make sure the data will be released by giving it to an autoreleased NSData
    [NSData dataWithBytesNoCopy:result length:m_width * m_height];

    return resultUIImage;
}
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2  
Thanks, that is working, but I get an image that is rotated by 90 degrees from the original position. How can I fix it? –  Ilya Suzdalnitski Aug 19 '09 at 16:22
8  
Wikipedia and others seem to imply that the correct distribution is 0.3RED+0.59GREEN+0.11Blue, not just averaging the sum of the three colors. –  mahboudz Aug 31 '09 at 19:23
2  
FYI there is a memory leak in Dutchie432's answer with respect to: ><code>uint8_t *m_imageData = (uint8_t *) malloc(m_width * m_height); ...which is never freed and should be. –  graemer957 Jan 28 '11 at 12:23
5  
This code does not appear to be properly converting the rgb image data to equivalent gray levels. It's worse than what is described in @mahboudz's otherwise valid comment since it isn't even averaging the three color components. Rather, due to what appears to be some sort of bug, it actually ends up just taking the green component from each pixel and making the the gray value. Since the eye is more responsive to green than the other two components, it's understandable why the answerer (and others) might have thought everything was working fine... –  martineau Jul 4 '12 at 13:09
1  
I think the problem is with the line int colors = kGreen;, which seems to force processing of only the green component of the pixels. To correct, try int colors = kGreen | kBlue | kRed;. –  mahboudz Jul 5 '12 at 18:55

I needed a version that preserved the alpha channel, so I modified the code posted by Dutchie432:

@implementation UIImage (grayscale)

typedef enum {
    ALPHA = 0,
    BLUE = 1,
    GREEN = 2,
    RED = 3
} PIXELS;

- (UIImage *)convertToGrayscale {
    CGSize size = [self size];
    int width = size.width;
    int height = size.height;

    // the pixels will be painted to this array
    uint32_t *pixels = (uint32_t *) malloc(width * height * sizeof(uint32_t));

    // clear the pixels so any transparency is preserved
    memset(pixels, 0, width * height * sizeof(uint32_t));

    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();

    // create a context with RGBA pixels
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(pixels, width, height, 8, width * sizeof(uint32_t), colorSpace, 
                                                 kCGBitmapByteOrder32Little | kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast);

    // paint the bitmap to our context which will fill in the pixels array
    CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0, 0, width, height), [self CGImage]);

    for(int y = 0; y < height; y++) {
        for(int x = 0; x < width; x++) {
            uint8_t *rgbaPixel = (uint8_t *) &pixels[y * width + x];

            // convert to grayscale using recommended method: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grayscale#Converting_color_to_grayscale
            uint32_t gray = 0.3 * rgbaPixel[RED] + 0.59 * rgbaPixel[GREEN] + 0.11 * rgbaPixel[BLUE];

            // set the pixels to gray
            rgbaPixel[RED] = gray;
            rgbaPixel[GREEN] = gray;
            rgbaPixel[BLUE] = gray;
        }
    }

    // create a new CGImageRef from our context with the modified pixels
    CGImageRef image = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);

    // we're done with the context, color space, and pixels
    CGContextRelease(context);
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);
    free(pixels);

    // make a new UIImage to return
    UIImage *resultUIImage = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:image];

    // we're done with image now too
    CGImageRelease(image);

    return resultUIImage;
}

@end
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1  
Nice work! In fact, I found another solution in a blog: smeans.com/2009/06/03/… But it can't work correctly in a PNG with transparent background, just let you know. –  firestoke Sep 7 '11 at 4:18
    
Thank you Cam! I made use of Ivan's update below which includes your solution. –  Christopher Jun 18 '12 at 21:21
    
It works, but not support Retina display, ruralcoder(below) updates this. –  android iPhone Dec 1 '12 at 23:20

Here is a code using only UIKit and the luminosity blending mode. A bit of a hack, but it works well.

// Transform the image in grayscale.
- (UIImage*) grayishImage: (UIImage*) inputImage {

    // Create a graphic context.
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(inputImage.size, YES, 1.0);
    CGRect imageRect = CGRectMake(0, 0, inputImage.size.width, inputImage.size.height);

    // Draw the image with the luminosity blend mode.
    // On top of a white background, this will give a black and white image.
    [inputImage drawInRect:imageRect blendMode:kCGBlendModeLuminosity alpha:1.0];

    // Get the resulting image.
    UIImage *filteredImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return filteredImage;

}

To keep the transparency, maybe you can just set the opaque mode parameter of the UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions to NO. Needs to be checked.

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1  
very nice and elegant solution that works well, thank you. –  thgc Sep 6 '11 at 10:49
    
For readers: UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions is iOS 4-only. Setting opaque to NO does not preserve alpha. –  Ivan Vučica Sep 15 '11 at 16:40
    
hardly a hack. perfect solution –  Jason Cragun Jan 30 '12 at 0:53
    
Small and Good solution !! :) –  TheTiger Jan 30 '13 at 12:41
1  
Nice small solution, if I set the opaque parameter to NO the code respects transparency but no longer appears to grayscale (ios 6+ at least). –  Diziet Jun 18 '13 at 11:16

Based on Cam's code with the ability to deal with the scale for Retina displays.

- (UIImage *) toGrayscale 
{
    const int RED = 1;
    const int GREEN = 2;
    const int BLUE = 3;

    // Create image rectangle with current image width/height
    CGRect imageRect = CGRectMake(0, 0, self.size.width * self.scale, self.size.height * self.scale);

    int width = imageRect.size.width;
    int height = imageRect.size.height;

    // the pixels will be painted to this array
    uint32_t *pixels = (uint32_t *) malloc(width * height * sizeof(uint32_t));

    // clear the pixels so any transparency is preserved
    memset(pixels, 0, width * height * sizeof(uint32_t));

    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB();

    // create a context with RGBA pixels
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(pixels, width, height, 8, width * sizeof(uint32_t), colorSpace, 
                                                 kCGBitmapByteOrder32Little | kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast);

    // paint the bitmap to our context which will fill in the pixels array
    CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0, 0, width, height), [self CGImage]);

    for(int y = 0; y < height; y++) {
        for(int x = 0; x < width; x++) {
            uint8_t *rgbaPixel = (uint8_t *) &pixels[y * width + x];

            // convert to grayscale using recommended method: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grayscale#Converting_color_to_grayscale
            uint8_t gray = (uint8_t) ((30 * rgbaPixel[RED] + 59 * rgbaPixel[GREEN] + 11 * rgbaPixel[BLUE]) / 100); 

            // set the pixels to gray
            rgbaPixel[RED] = gray;
            rgbaPixel[GREEN] = gray;
            rgbaPixel[BLUE] = gray;
        }
    }

    // create a new CGImageRef from our context with the modified pixels
    CGImageRef image = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);

    // we're done with the context, color space, and pixels
    CGContextRelease(context);
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);
    free(pixels);

    // make a new UIImage to return
    UIImage *resultUIImage = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:image
                                                 scale:self.scale 
                                           orientation:UIImageOrientationUp];

    // we're done with image now too
    CGImageRelease(image);

    return resultUIImage;
}
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This is excellent. Thank you! –  Axeva Aug 25 '11 at 2:34
    
Works very well, including retina. Thank you Ivan! –  Christopher Jun 18 '12 at 21:20
1  
Works pretty well even on PNG with transparent background! Thank you! –  Chris Chen Aug 26 '12 at 4:19
    
Thanks a ton! I needed a way to autogenerate a "glyph" based on a changing image, and this is perfect! –  StCredZero Sep 21 '12 at 21:16
1  
I have improved the performance a bit by replacing the floats by integers. The performance could be further improved by only one for and adding 4 to rgbaPixel pointer instead of calculating its position with every iteration. –  Sulthan Aug 28 '13 at 15:44

I liked Mathieu Godart's answer, but it didn't seem to work properly for retina or alpha images. Here's an updated version that seems to work for both of those for me:

- (UIImage*)convertToGrayscale
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.size, NO, self.scale);
    CGRect imageRect = CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, self.size.width, self.size.height);

    CGContextRef ctx = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    // Draw a white background
    CGContextSetRGBFillColor(ctx, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f);
    CGContextFillRect(ctx, imageRect);

    // Draw the luminosity on top of the white background to get grayscale
    [self drawInRect:imageRect blendMode:kCGBlendModeLuminosity alpha:1.0f];

    // Apply the source image's alpha
    [self drawInRect:imageRect blendMode:kCGBlendModeDestinationIn alpha:1.0f];

    UIImage* grayscaleImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return grayscaleImage;
}
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1  
makes my semi-transparent colored image too light. –  malcolmhall Feb 8 '13 at 1:33
    
great solution, must be accepted –  João Nunes Aug 27 '13 at 8:26

Here is another good solution as a category method on UIImage. It's based on this blog post and its comments. But I fixed a memory issue here:

- (UIImage *)grayScaleImage {
    // Create image rectangle with current image width/height
    CGRect imageRect = CGRectMake(0, 0, self.size.width * self.scale, self.size.height * self.scale);
    // Grayscale color space
    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceGray();
    // Create bitmap content with current image size and grayscale colorspace
    CGContextRef context = CGBitmapContextCreate(nil, self.size.width * self.scale, self.size.height * self.scale, 8, 0, colorSpace, kCGImageAlphaNone);
    // Draw image into current context, with specified rectangle
    // using previously defined context (with grayscale colorspace)
    CGContextDrawImage(context, imageRect, [self CGImage]);
    // Create bitmap image info from pixel data in current context
    CGImageRef grayImage = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);
    // release the colorspace and graphics context
    CGColorSpaceRelease(colorSpace);
    CGContextRelease(context);
    // make a new alpha-only graphics context
    context = CGBitmapContextCreate(nil, self.size.width * self.scale, self.size.height * self.scale, 8, 0, nil, kCGImageAlphaOnly);
    // draw image into context with no colorspace
    CGContextDrawImage(context, imageRect, [self CGImage]);
    // create alpha bitmap mask from current context
    CGImageRef mask = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);
    // release graphics context
    CGContextRelease(context);
    // make UIImage from grayscale image with alpha mask
    CGImageRef cgImage = CGImageCreateWithMask(grayImage, mask);
    UIImage *grayScaleImage = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:cgImage scale:self.scale orientation:self.imageOrientation];
    // release the CG images
CGImageRelease(cgImage);
    CGImageRelease(grayImage);
    CGImageRelease(mask);
    // return the new grayscale image
    return grayScaleImage;
}
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1  
Unfortunately whites get tinted grey with this code –  malcolmhall Feb 8 '13 at 1:31

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