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I'm trying to parse the class schedule provided by my university in order to import the information into some kind of calendar. An example of the schedule can be seen here:
http://www.asw-berufsakademie.de/fileadmin/download/download/Sked%20Stundenplan/WIA13-7.%20Block.html

The auto-generated HTML-content is, in my opinion, a mess and very hard to grasp. E.g. the tables are mainly built with rowspans and colspans (the positions of cells in the code compared with their actual visual position in the browser seem partially arbitrary).

What I've already tried:

  1. Asking the university's administration office to provide a simpler, easier to read file separately. Of course this wasn't possible, after all it would mean one minute of additional effort.
  2. Researching the original tool used to generate the HTML. It is called "sked Stundenplan Software". I couldn't find any hints or tools to "reverse" the generation process.
  3. Looking for an existing solution, at which point I found some tools (e.g. http://code.google.com/p/skd-schedule-parser/) that do not work for my schedule. After studying the codes of these tools I concluded that they must have been designed for an other/outdated version of sked.
  4. Parsing the HTML with PHP (mostly using DOMDocument). That worked sometimes, but was way too unreliable...The exceptions to take into account seem indefinite.

Right now I don't think that conventional HTML parsing will get me far, at least not in an acceptable developing time. What I am looking for are other methods to fetch information from complex HTML tables, something like YQL, or maybe utilities that can normalize such tables with col-/rowspans. Because I don't have anything concrete in mind, I am mainly asking for some tips or hints for another approach.

Are there other, more suitable methods to parse such tables or am I stuck with conventional HTML parsing?

Edit:

On behalf of a request, I'll paste an example of raw code...

This week:
Schedule week

Results from this code:
http://pastebin.com/BJduUVtU

Edit 2:
Because of some parsing discussions I'll also add my PHP code. It's my first time with PHP so it's not very sophisticated. It should rather give an insight on how far I've come with parsing the tables in theory. The actual work happens in the function parseSkedTable(), please concentrate on this one. Also, I would like to point out the term "double courses" appearing in the comments, which describes two different courses happening at the same time (the class would be split in such moments). An example of these courses can be found here in week two:
http://www.asw-berufsakademie.de/fileadmin/download/download/Sked%20Stundenplan/WIB14-4.%20Block.html

It looks like this: Double courses

The corresponding HTML-code of that week can also be accessed here:
http://pastebin.com/gLTWz5KU

And now the PHP-code (I had a hard time translating the comments since I already struggled expressing them in my first language...I hope they may still be helpful):
http://pastebin.com/Nzi8m2v8

Update

So far, there have been some solutions to my parsing problem, each of them using JavaScript. Since JavaScript (being especially powerful here because of the ability to use browser-rendered data) seems to be the only efficient way to retrieve reliable information from the HTML, I am now looking for a way to implement some kind of headless browser or rendering engine on my free server at x10hosting.com. Sadly, I am neither able to install software other than provided by softaculous nor allowed to use PHP's exec() command.
Any idea would be appreciated!

For the sake of completeness, I'll post both solutions, existing until now:

  1. jQuery parser by Pierre Dubois:

    (function ($) { $(document).ready(function() {

        var _pe = window.pe || {
            fn : {}
        };
    
        var tblNumber = 0; // Just a incremental number to identify the schedule item with the table
    
        // For each table
        $('table').each(function () {
    
            $('#output').append('Parsing the table number: ' + tblNumber + '<br>');
            // console.log('Parsing the table number: ' + tblNumber);
            tblNumber += 1;
    
            var currentTable = this;
    
    
            // Parser the complex table
            _pe.fn.parsertable.parse($(currentTable));
    
            // Retrieve the parsed data
            var parsedData = $(currentTable).data().tblparser;
    
            //
            // Information about the column structure, nice that is consistent
            //
    
            // Day: Cell index position (0 based)
            // Mo: 3
            // Di: 7
            // Mi: 11
            // Do: 15
            // Fr: 19
            // Sa: 23
    
            // Title Location at Row index position "0"
    
            // "i" represent the middle column position
            for (var i = 3; i < 24; i += 4) {
    
                var currentDay;
    
                // Get the day
                currentDay = $(parsedData.row[0].cell[i].elem).text();
    
                $('#output').append('  Day: ' + currentDay + '<br>');
                // console.log('Day: ' + currentDay);
    
                // Get all the events for that day, excluding the first row and the last row
                for (var j = 1; j < parsedData.col[i].cell.length - 2; j += 1) {
    
                    // First column 
                    if (parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j - 1].uid !== parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j].uid ) {
    
                        // Get the content of that cell and remove ending space
                        var event = $(parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j].elem).text().trim();
    
                        if (event.length > 0) {
                            $('#output').append('  + Event: ' + event + '<br>');
                            // console.log('Event: ' + event);
                        }
                    }
    
                    // Second Column
                    if (parsedData.col[i].cell[j - 1].uid !== parsedData.col[i].cell[j].uid &&
                        parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j].uid !== parsedData.col[i].cell[j].uid) {
    
                        // Get the content of that cell and remove ending space
                        var event = $(parsedData.col[i].cell[j].elem).text().trim();
    
                        if (event.length > 0) {
                            $('#output').append('  + Event: ' + event + '<br>');
                            // console.log('Event: ' + event);
                        }
                    }
    
                    // Third Column
                    if (parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j - 1].uid !== parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j].uid &&
                        parsedData.col[i].cell[j].uid !== parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j].uid) {
    
                        // Get the content of that cell and remove ending space
                        var event = $(parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j].elem).text().trim();
    
                        if (event.length > 0) {
                            $('#output').append('  + Event: ' + event + '<br>');
                            // console.log('Event: ' + event);
                        }
                    }
                } 
    
            }
    
        });
    
    
    });
    

    }(jQuery));

  2. JS parser using positional information by me, realizing rambo coder's idea

share|improve this question
1  
Oh brother. I'm not sure whether a tool exists to parse that kind of a mess. ("Mess" from a HTML point of view. Visually, it looks pretty neat!) –  Pekka 웃 Oct 20 '12 at 13:28
    
Side note: on Stack Overflow, we aim for self-contained questions that are valid even when external sites go down. Could you post an example of the kind of HTML code that you need to parse in here? Use the {} button to format it as code. Thanks! –  Pekka 웃 Oct 20 '12 at 13:32
    
Why do you care about the rowspans when the time is in the cells? Why don't you just create a hash/array of dates pulled from the header and then only worry about the columns and parse the text for the time? Looks pretty simple using any of the standard XML parsing methods and basic regex. –  Matt Whipple Oct 20 '12 at 13:32
    
@Matt look at the table. It's a total, utter catastrophe in terms of programmatically interpreting anything. I bet a 3-hour course would be marked by a cell that has an increased rowspan... good luck parsing that. –  Pekka 웃 Oct 20 '12 at 13:33
2  
It looks like the <td> elements that you're interested in all have "class='v'", so you could probably just parse those, and ignore everything else. –  GreyBeardedGeek Oct 20 '12 at 13:44

5 Answers 5

You could make use of a browsers rendering/layout engine here.

Use http://phantomjs.org/ to get access to a headless browser that lets you execute javascript on a webpage's dom.

A dash of jquery would make the remaining pseudocode easy to implement:

foreach (td.t as dateElement) {
    //parse date from element text
    //use pixel position + dimensions to calc pixel coord of center
    // save this center in a list along with the date
}

foreach (td.v as calendarEntryElement) {
    //parse time + other stuff from element text
    //use pixel position to find the closest date element in that list(it must be the closest one above)
}

I feel positional information would be very reliable here, because everything is a nested rectangle and its all done via tables.

You don't need to use phantomjs, you could just as easily execute a browser manually, and let it send a request to a local server to collect the results.

Some shell command roughly like

firefox file://foo123.html

Where you've appended some custom <script> to the end of one of their webpages and saved it.

share|improve this answer
    
I adopted that idea and wrote a quick Userscript, it seems to work very well in Chrome. Here's the code: pastebin.com/d6QG7mv7 Is there an easy way to implement this in a PHP based script? My server is hosted at x10hosting.com (free), so I don't have many persmissions. –  MCL Oct 22 '12 at 13:44
    
If you have shell access, and can use php's program execution functions like exec(), I think you'll be ok. But otherwise, I can't think of any straightforward way. If you don't need realtime data collection, you could have your home computer periodically(cron/scheduled task) download a list of pending jobs from the web server, complete them, and upload the results. –  goat Oct 22 '12 at 14:13
    
I've been looking for ways to render JavaScript combined with HTML and I feel like I'm running out of options. Apparently, I am only allowed to install software provided by softaculous. There doesn't seem to be any kind of JavaScript engine or headless browser available. Is there a simple includable library that I just can't find, to get the job done? –  MCL Oct 22 '12 at 19:14

Many developers use HTML Agility Pack to parse HTML:

http://htmlagilitypack.codeplex.com/

share|improve this answer

I have some hope for your problem since the html is well formed and is x-html compliant.

The following Java program parse it successfully but without extracting information.

import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilder;
import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory;

import org.w3c.dom.Document;

public final class AgendaParser {
   public static void main( String[] args ) throws Throwable {
      long atStart = System.currentTimeMillis();
      DocumentBuilderFactory dbf = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
      DocumentBuilder db = dbf.newDocumentBuilder();
      Document doc = db.parse( "WIA13-7. Block.html" );
      System.err.println( "Elapsed time: " + ( System.currentTimeMillis() - atStart ) / 1000L + " seconds" );
      System.err.println( doc.getElementsByTagName( "table" ));
   }
}

it outputs:

Elapsed time: 118 seconds (very long, no?)
com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.dom.DeepNodeListImpl@7faea002

I thing a couple of hours of work gives you 80% of the extraction.

share|improve this answer

Interresting complex table. A mix between a layout table and a data table.

This may help you, that solution is in jQuery and use the same complex table parser available in the Web Experience Toolkit Project. With that table parser, you will be able to retreive your schedule data. The only thing that need to be done would be to parse the schedule item content for the importation to your calendar apps.

This solution use the column instead of the row to retrieve the schedule items

Working example : http://jsfiddle.net/3t2A8/2/

Here the javascript code that is used to extract and show the schedule items

(function ($) {
    $(document).ready(function() {

        var _pe = window.pe || {
            fn : {}
        };

        var tblNumber = 0; // Just a incremental number to identify the schedule item with the table

        // For each table
        $('table').each(function () {

            $('#output').append('Parsing the table number: ' + tblNumber + '<br>');
            // console.log('Parsing the table number: ' + tblNumber);
            tblNumber += 1;

            var currentTable = this;


            // Parser the complex table
            _pe.fn.parsertable.parse($(currentTable));

            // Retrieve the parsed data
            var parsedData = $(currentTable).data().tblparser;

            //
            // Information about the column structure, nice that is consistent
            //

            // Day: Cell index position (0 based)
            // Mo: 3
            // Di: 7
            // Mi: 11
            // Do: 15
            // Fr: 19
            // Sa: 23

            // Title Location at Row index position "0"

            // "i" represent the middle column position
            for (var i = 3; i < 24; i += 4) {

                var currentDay;

                // Get the day
                currentDay = $(parsedData.row[0].cell[i].elem).text();

                $('#output').append('  Day: ' + currentDay + '<br>');
                // console.log('Day: ' + currentDay);

                // Get all the events for that day, excluding the first row and the last row
                for (var j = 1; j < parsedData.col[i].cell.length - 2; j += 1) {

                    // First column 
                    if (parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j - 1].uid !== parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j].uid ) {

                        // Get the content of that cell and remove ending space
                        var event = $(parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j].elem).text().trim();

                        if (event.length > 0) {
                            $('#output').append('  + Event: ' + event + '<br>');
                            // console.log('Event: ' + event);
                        }
                    }

                    // Second Column
                    if (parsedData.col[i].cell[j - 1].uid !== parsedData.col[i].cell[j].uid &&
                        parsedData.col[i - 1].cell[j].uid !== parsedData.col[i].cell[j].uid) {

                        // Get the content of that cell and remove ending space
                        var event = $(parsedData.col[i].cell[j].elem).text().trim();

                        if (event.length > 0) {
                            $('#output').append('  + Event: ' + event + '<br>');
                            // console.log('Event: ' + event);
                        }
                    }

                    // Third Column
                    if (parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j - 1].uid !== parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j].uid &&
                        parsedData.col[i].cell[j].uid !== parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j].uid) {

                        // Get the content of that cell and remove ending space
                        var event = $(parsedData.col[i + 1].cell[j].elem).text().trim();

                        if (event.length > 0) {
                            $('#output').append('  + Event: ' + event + '<br>');
                            // console.log('Event: ' + event);
                        }
                    }
                } 

            }

        });


    });

}(jQuery));

it would output for the "double courses" table

Parsing the table number: 0
  Day: Mo, 22.10.2012
  + Event: 12:45 - 14:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 1
      HG: 13
  + Event: 12:45 - 14:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 2
      HG: 15
  + Event: 14:30 - 16:00 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 1
      HG: 13
  + Event: 14:30 - 16:00 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 2
      HG: 15
  + Event: 16:15 - 17:45 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 2
      HG: 13
  + Event: 16:15 - 17:45 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 1
      HG: 15
  + Event: 18:00 - 19:30 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 2
      HG: 13
  + Event: 18:00 - 19:30 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 1
      HG: 15
  Day: Di, 23.10.2012
  + Event: 9:00 - 10:30 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 2
      HG: 13
  + Event: 10:45 - 12:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 2
      HG: 13
  + Event: 12:45 - 14:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 1
      HG: 13
  + Event: 14:30 - 16:00 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD Gr. 1
      HG: 13
  + Event: 16:15 - 17:45 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 1
      HG: 15
  + Event: 18:00 - 19:30 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 1
      HG: 15
  Day: Mi, 24.10.2012
  + Event: 9:00 - 10:30 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD
      HG: 09
  + Event: 10:45 - 12:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      DATMOD
      HG: 09
  + Event: 12:45 - 14:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      IuF
      HG: 09
  + Event: 14:30 - 16:00 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      IuF
      HG: 09
  Day: Do, 25.10.2012
  + Event: 12:45 - 14:15 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 2
      HG: 15
  + Event: 14:30 - 16:00 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      PROG III Gr. 2
      HG: 15
  + Event: 16:15 - 17:45 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      Linux Gr. 2
      HG: 15
  + Event: 18:00 - 19:30 Uhr
      Vorlesung
      Linux Gr. 2
      HG: 15
  Day: Fr, 26.10.2012
  Day: Sa, 27.10.2012
  + Event: 9:00 - 11:15 Uhr
      Klausur
      MP INT RW
      HG: 14

:-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your detailed answer. A method based on JavaScript (using positional information) has been discussed before (s. rambo coder's answer and the respective comments). My current problem is implementing this on a server using only PHP without being able to install additional software. My server is hosted at x10hosting.com; I am willing to use another alternative, as long, of course, it is for free ;) –  MCL Oct 23 '12 at 21:35
    
However my trick is on generating a new table where each cell is split in his smaller size, where the rowspan and colspan have no effect. After you have just to navigate on the cells by using the appropriate column. You can use the DOM php class or/and SimpleXML php class to help you to navigation on the table node structure. With that it's possible to migrate the Line 1025 to Line 1292 from the table parser where for each row it create the cell in his smaller size. :-) –  Pierre Dubois Oct 23 '12 at 22:41

pseudoPHP

class ScheduleTableParser {
  buildTimetableFromTable() {
    //Trivial
    Parse Day Rowspans, Day Names, Dates into $this->days;
    e.g. $days[0]['rowspan'] = 4 for Monday 22/10/2012

    //Extract Lessons      
    $tr = 0;
    foreach tr {
      $td = 0;
      foreach td{
        if(td.class = 'v') {
          parseClass($td,$tr,$tdDOMObject);
        }
        $td++;
      }
    }
 }
 parseClass($td,$tr,$tdDOMObject) {
   //Trivial
   Get the Class Name Etc   

   //Calculate Time
   $time = 9:00 + 5mins*tr;
   $tr = $tr - 2;
   $i = 0;
   while($tr > 0) {
     $tr - $this->days[$i]['rowspan'];
     $day = $this->days[$i]['name'];
     $date = $this->days[$i]['date'];
     $i++;
   }
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, this isn't enough. The td.v elements do not contain information on the date they refer to, which naturally is an essential part. Please q.v. the comments of my question. –  MCL Oct 23 '12 at 21:48
    
Rewrote my answer @MCL –  Philip Whitehouse Oct 24 '12 at 18:07

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