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My code is using many Dictionaries and I'm having issues freeing memory from all of them. When I investigate using what I learned in this answer I see that the GenericEqualityComparer is there, and I suspect that is what is keeping this memory in use.

Can anyone confirm this, or tell me how I can free up this memory?

Code

        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: Start Point", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        List<string> t1 = new List<string>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- Create List", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        t1 = null;
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- null List", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));

        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: After GC.Collect", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        Dictionary<string, string> t2 = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- Create Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        t2 = null;
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- null Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));


        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: After GC.Collect", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        Dictionary<string, string> t3 = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- Create Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        t3 = null;
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- null Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));

        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: After GC.Collect", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        Dictionary<string, string> t4 = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- Create Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        t4 = null;
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- null Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));

        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: After GC.Collect", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        Dictionary<string, string> t5 = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- Create Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        t5 = null;
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- null Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));

        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: After GC.Collect", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        Dictionary<string, string> t6 = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- Create Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));
        GC.KeepAlive(t6);
        t6 = null;
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- null Dict", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));

        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("{0,10}: <------- End.", GC.GetTotalMemory(true));

Note: I have two versions of this code. One edit with GC.Collect as was suggested here on SO, but that affords no benefit.

Output without GC Collection

 95884: Start Point
 97872: <------- Create List
 97888: <------- null List
 97952: <------- Create Dict
 97968: <------- null Dict
 98032: <------- Create Dict
 98048: <------- null Dict
 98112: <------- Create Dict
 98128: <------- null Dict
 98192: <------- Create Dict
 98208: <------- null Dict
 98272: <------- Create Dict
 98288: <------- null Dict

Output With GC collection (per suggestion)

 96004: Start Point
 97992: <------- Create List
 98008: <------- null List
 98024: After GC.Collect
 98088: <------- Create Dict
 98104: <------- null Dict
 98120: After GC.Collect
 98184: <------- Create Dict
 98200: <------- null Dict
 98216: After GC.Collect
 98280: <------- Create Dict
 98296: <------- null Dict
 98312: After GC.Collect
 98376: <------- Create Dict
 98392: <------- null Dict
 98408: After GC.Collect
 98472: <------- Create Dict
 98488: <------- null Dict
 98504: <------- End.

Output in Release mode (per suggestion)

 96028: Start Point
 98016: <------- Create List
 98032: <------- null List
 98048: After GC.Collect
 98112: <------- Create Dict
 98128: <------- null Dict
 98144: After GC.Collect
 98208: <------- Create Dict
 98224: <------- null Dict
 98240: After GC.Collect
 98304: <------- Create Dict
 98320: <------- null Dict
 98336: After GC.Collect
 98400: <------- Create Dict
 98416: <------- null Dict
 98432: After GC.Collect
 98496: <------- Create Dict
 98512: <------- null Dict
 98528: <------- End.

Output in Release mode without GC Collect (per suggestion)

 96028: Start Point
 98016: <------- Create List
 98032: <------- null List
 98096: <------- Create Dict
 98112: <------- null Dict
 98176: <------- Create Dict
 98192: <------- null Dict
 98256: <------- Create Dict
 98272: <------- null Dict
 98336: <------- Create Dict
 98352: <------- null Dict
 98416: <------- Create Dict
 98432: <------- null Dict
 98448: <------- End.
share|improve this question
    
@Yossarian I added GC collect as you requested, but memory usage is higher now. I suspect I promoted whatever was hanging around into Gen2 and made the problem worse –  LamonteCristo Oct 20 '12 at 13:39
    
I'd say that GC.Collect will do full collection, even with Gen2 objects. –  Yossarian Oct 20 '12 at 13:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In debug mode GC does not collect objects in your current method scope, because references to them still exist. Try build it for release, run without debugging and check results.

Code that prints true in debug mode but false in release:

object obj = new object();
WeakReference reference = new WeakReference(obj);
GC.Collect(0, GCCollectionMode.Forced);
Console.WriteLine(reference.IsAlive);

Edit from OP: Debug mode did make the memory usage increase artificially. When I ran the stand alone app, I got this output. Thank you, and I'm accepting this answer.

 21852: Start Point
 29328: <------- Create List
 29328: <------- null List
 29328: <------- Create Dict
 29328: <------- null Dict
 29328: <------- Create Dict
 29328: <------- null Dict
 29328: <------- Create Dict
 29328: <------- null Dict
 29328: <------- Create Dict
 29328: <------- null Dict
 29376: <------- Create Dict
 29328: <------- null Dict
 29328: <------- End.
share|improve this answer
    
@This will reliably work only in .NET 4 onwards. Also this will cause Gen0 and Gen1 objects which are reaqchable to be promoted to Gen2 which will in turn make it more difficult to release memory in the future. –  Ganesh R. Oct 20 '12 at 13:36
    
butirat Thanks, this did the trick. I edited your answer with the output. Hope you don't mind. :) –  LamonteCristo Oct 20 '12 at 13:53
    
Yes, I agree with @GaneshR. can you remove the the part asking for GC.Collect, that is unneeded for me and may cause confusion in others. –  LamonteCristo Oct 20 '12 at 13:55
    
@makerofthings7 you are welcome ) –  2kay Oct 20 '12 at 13:58

Well, you are not freeing memory by doing

value = null;

You are only setting a value to null, not removing something from memory. The Garbage Collector isn't explicitly requested to perform its tasks.

GC.Collect();

Is what you need to perform its tasks. You don't normally do that because the GC is well written and choose it's own time to do his collect of unused objects. It can also take a good hit at your performance if you call it too often for no reasons. There's also a collection of condition on how and why the GC would collect something or not. Debug, method, scope and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not exactly true. GC.GetTotalMemory(true) will do garbage collection, see my answer. –  Yossarian Oct 20 '12 at 13:39
    
@Yossarian: "The garbage collector does not guarantee that all inaccessible memory is collected." Debug mode and method scope might very well prevent that. –  LightStriker Oct 20 '12 at 13:42

From the documentation for GC.GetTotalMemory:

If the forceFullCollection parameter is true, this method waits a short interval before returning while the system collects garbage and finalizes objects. The duration of the interval is an internally specified limit determined by the number of garbage collection cycles completed and the change in the amount of memory recovered between cycles. The garbage collector does not guarantee that all inaccessible memory is collected.

So, there is no bug, GC is nondeterministic, you cannot rely on GetTotalMemory(true) will clean up everything.

You'd need to call GC.Collect() for doing full garbage collection.

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