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I want to create 2-d array in python like this:

     n1 n2 n3 n4 n5

w1   1  4  0  1 10

w2   3  0  7  0  3

w3   0  12 9  5  4

w4   9  0  0  9  7

Where w1 w2... are the different words and n1 n2 n3 are different blogs.
How can I achieve this?

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2  
What have you tried so far? –  Rohit Jain Oct 20 '12 at 13:35
    
What's the use case? - Looks more like you want a 2-tuple (word,blog): freq dict... –  Jon Clements Oct 20 '12 at 13:37
    
i`m workng one project in data mining and in that at somewhere i want to collect data like this .and i know the individual word count of the each blog [n1 n1..].I just create spradesheet,i already have this value.let me know the way to create this in python. –  Target Oct 20 '12 at 13:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that the text from each blog is available as a string, and you have a list of such strings available in blogs, this is how you'd create your matrix.

import re
# Sample input for the following code.
blogs = ["This is a blog.","This is another blog.","Cats? Cats are awesome."]
# This is a list that will contain dictionaries counting the wordcounts for each blog
wordcount = []
# This is a list of all unique words in all blogs.
wordlist = []
# Consider each blog sequentially
for blog in blogs:
    # Remove all the non-alphanumeric, non-whitespace characters,
    # and then split the string at all whitespace after converting to lowercase.
    # eg: "That's not mine." -> "Thats not mine" -> ["thats","not","mine"]
    words = re.sub("\s+"," ",re.sub("[^\w\s]","",blog)).lower().split(" ")
    # Add a new dictionary to the list. As it is at the end,
    # it can be referred to by wordcount[-1]
    wordcount.append({})
    # Consider each word in the list generated above.
    for word in words:
        # If that word has been encountered before, increment the count
        if word in wordcount[-1]: wordcount[-1][word]+=1
        # Else, create a new entry in the dictionary
        else: wordcount[-1][word]=1
        # If it is not already in the list of unique words, add it.
        if word not in wordlist: wordlist.append(word)

# We now have wordlist, which has a unique list of all words in all blogs.
# and wordcount, which contains len(blogs) dictionaries, containing word counts.
# Matrix is the table that you need of wordcounts. The number of rows will be
# equal to the number of unique words, and the number of columns = no. of blogs.
matrix = []
# Consider each word in the unique list of words (corresponding to each row)
for word in wordlist:
    # Add as many columns as there are blogs, all initialized to zero.
    matrix.append([0]*len(wordcount))
    # Consider each blog one by one
    for i in range(len(wordcount)):
        # Check if the currently selected word appears in that blog
        if word in wordcount[i]:
            # If yes, increment the counter for that blog/column
            matrix[-1][i]+=wordcount[i][word]

# For printing matrix, first generate the column headings
temp = "\t"
for i in range(len(blogs)):
    temp+="Blog "+str(i+1)+"\t"

print temp
# Then generate each row, with the word at the starting, and tabs between numbers.

for i in range(len(matrix)):
    temp = wordlist[i]+"\t"
    for j in matrix[i]: temp += str(j)+"\t"
    print temp

Now, matrix[i][j] will contain the number of times the word wordlist[i] appears in blog blogs[j].

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Hello Kaustubh , please can you add the commet line for the better understaing for me.I ooking for the same ans .plz comment the code .And one thing if i want to print it then how to print it ? –  Target Oct 21 '12 at 5:30
    
I over-did it, I know :P Anyway ... copy paste the entire thing in an interactive console to see it in action. –  Kaustubh Karkare Oct 21 '12 at 6:59
    
Thanks Kaustubh...! –  Target Oct 21 '12 at 7:56

If tuples in a list or a dict won't do, consider using pandas:

from pandas import *
In [554]: print DataFrame({'n1':[1,3,0,9], 'n2':[4,0,12,0], 'n3':[0,7,9,0], 'n4':[1,0,5,9], 'n5':[10,3,4,7]},index=['w1','w2','w3','w4'])
    n1  n2  n3  n4  n5
w1   1   4   0   1  10
w2   3   0   7   0   3
w3   0  12   9   5   4
w4   9   0   0   9   7
share|improve this answer
    
and without using this pandas ? –  Target Oct 20 '12 at 13:48
    
Look at @Jon Clement's comment. But the answer depends on what you want to do with that data. But note that while there are various ways to hold the data, they will probably not be the same as your example. –  root Oct 20 '12 at 13:57

I wouldn't create any lists at all, nor a 2-d array, but instead create a dictionary that was keyed by both your x and y headers, as a tuple. As in:

data["w1", "n1"] = 1

This can be thought of as kind of a "sparse matrix" representation. Depending on what operations you wanted to perform on the data, you might alternatively want a dict of dicts, where the key to the outer dict was either the xheader or the yheader, and the key to the inner was the reverse.

Assuming the tuples-as-keys representation, taking your data table as input:

text = """\
     n1 n2 n3 n4 n5

w1   1  4  0  1 10

w2   3  0  7  0  3

w3   0  12 9  5  4

w4   9  0  0  9  7
"""

data = {}
lines = text.splitlines()
xheaders = lines.pop(0).split()
for line in lines:
    if not line.strip():
        continue
    elems = line.split()
    yheader = elems[0]
    for (xheader, datum) in zip(xheaders, elems[1:]):
        data[xheader, yheader] = int(datum)
print data
print sorted(data.items())

The print produces:

{('n3', 'w4'): 0, ('n4', 'w2'): 0, ('n2', 'w2'): 0, ('n1', 'w4'): 9, ('n3', 'w3'): 9, ('n2', 'w3'): 12, ('n3', 'w2'): 7, ('n2', 'w4'): 0, ('n5', 'w3'): 4, ('n2', 'w1'): 4, ('n4', 'w1'): 1, ('n5', 'w2'): 3, ('n5', 'w1'): 10, ('n4', 'w3'): 5, ('n4', 'w4'): 9, ('n1', 'w3'): 0, ('n1', 'w2'): 3, ('n5', 'w4'): 7, ('n1', 'w1'): 1, ('n3', 'w1'): 0}
[(('n1', 'w1'), 1), (('n1', 'w2'), 3), (('n1', 'w3'), 0), (('n1', 'w4'), 9), (('n2', 'w1'), 4), (('n2', 'w2'), 0), (('n2', 'w3'), 12), (('n2', 'w4'), 0), (('n3', 'w1'), 0), (('n3', 'w2'), 7), (('n3', 'w3'), 9), (('n3', 'w4'), 0), (('n4', 'w1'), 1), (('n4', 'w2'), 0), (('n4', 'w3'), 5), (('n4', 'w4'), 9), (('n5', 'w1'), 10), (('n5', 'w2'), 3), (('n5', 'w3'), 4), (('n5', 'w4'), 7)]
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One way is to use numpy:

>>> from numpy import array
>>> array( [ (1,4,0,1,10), (3,0,7,0,3), (0,12,9,5,4), (9,0,0,9,7) ] )
array([[ 1,  4,  0,  1, 10],
   [ 3,  0,  7,  0,  3],
   [ 0, 12,  9,  5,  4],
   [ 9,  0,  0,  9,  7]])
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If you simply want 2D array without any parsing, you can write it like this:

a = [
    [1, 4, 0, 1, 10],
    [3, 0, 7, 0, 3],
    [0, 12, 9, 5, 4],
    [9, 0, 0, 9, 7]
]
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