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I have a class that extends Hash, and I want to track when a hash key is modified. What's the right syntax to override the [key]= syntactic method to accomplish this? (I want to insert my code, then call the parent method.)

Is this possible with the C methods? I see from the docs that the underlying method is rb_hash_aset(VALUE hash, VALUE key, VALUE val) - how does that get assigned to the bracket syntax?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The method signature is def []=(key, val), and super to call the parent method. Here's a full example:

class MyHash < Hash
  def []=(key,val)
    printf("key: %s, val: %s\n", key, val)
    super(key,val)
  end
end

x = MyHash.new

x['a'] = 'hello'
x['b'] = 'world'

p x
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1  
The [key]=value notation is so called "syntactic sugar" –  Björn Nilsson Oct 20 '12 at 13:55
    
I'm aware of that. It's unclear how that syntactic sugar gets assigned to the underlying method though. –  fields Oct 27 '12 at 22:46
    
ruby.dbgr.cc/e if you want to step through/debug the code –  nOOb cODEr Jun 27 at 18:59
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class MyHash < Hash
  def []=(key,value)
    super
  end
end
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Ok, maybe that should have been obvious. –  fields Oct 20 '12 at 13:54
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I think using set_trace_func is more general solution

class MyHash < Hash
  def initialize
    super
  end

  def []=(key,val)
    super
  end
end

set_trace_func proc { |event, file, line, id, binding, classname|
  printf "%10s %8s\n", id, classname if classname == MyHash
}

h = MyHash.new
h[:t] = 't'

#=>
initialize   MyHash
initialize   MyHash
initialize   MyHash
       []=   MyHash
       []=   MyHash
       []=   MyHash
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