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I'm new to regex and trying to create the expression for a string that is to consist of only:

  • letters
  • numbers
  • Underscore symbol
  • Period symbol (full stop)

So far I have this:

/[a-zA-Z0-9,\.\_]/;

As I said I'm fairly new so expect this to be totally wrong!

Thanks.

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2  
You may (also) want to try CodeReview.SE for this type of question. –  Jeroen Oct 20 '12 at 13:59
    
[\w\.]? Regular Expressions (MDN). –  David Thomas Oct 20 '12 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
/^[a-z0-9._]+$/i

EDIT: David Thomas suggests a nice alternative: /^[\w.]+$/i -- possible locale issues.

You have a comma that I don't think you intend to have, but if you do just put it back. the i modifier makes the expression case-insensitive.

Inside of character classes, periods don't need to be escaped (not relevant if you do: http://jsfiddle.net/pvgTT/1/)

You need the ^ and $ (beginning and end of string) to match against the entire string. Otherwise, it could match a string that has at least one such character but could also have others.

+ (1 or more) is used. Could also be * (0 or more). Either is required since the length of the string is unknown.

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Thanks so much, it works. –  A B Oct 20 '12 at 14:04

What you need more:

  • A ^ at the beginning to match the beginning of the string
  • A $ at the end to match the end of the string
  • A multiplier on the set so that it can match more than one character

The + multiplier makes the set match one or more characters. The comma should not be in the set, as you don't want to match commas. The . and _ don't need escaping inside a set:

^[a-zA-Z0-9._]+$

The \w code matches letters, digits and underscore, so you can use:

^[\w.]+$
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