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I've purchased an SSL certificate from godaddy. I've created a keystore file, generated a csr file from it, sent it to godaddy, and received these files:

  • mydomain.crt
  • gd_intermediate.crt
  • gd_bundle.crt

Now I am trying to create an Elastic Load Balancer in AWS console. When asked for a certificate details, they ask for:

  • Private Key (pem encoded)
  • Public Key Certificate (pem encoded)
  • Certificate Chain (pem encoded, optional)

How do I convert the files I have to these parameters?

Thanks, Yair

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reformy, which files did you use at the end of the process for these 3 fields? host.pem, public.pem and gd_intermediate? I can't configure those keys using this tutorial =/ –  Crasher Dec 17 '13 at 17:54

3 Answers 3

For AWS ELB you need three thing as you said

Private Key

The rsa key you Generated on linux with

#openssl genrsa -des3 -out host.key 2048

it will ask for password, give it for now we will remove it later.

Public key

from your private key you first Generate csr file which is Certificate Signing Request(the one you submit to authority in your case godaddy to get public key). you can Generate csr file using

#openssl req -new -key host.key -out host.csr

now you submit your csr file to godaddy and in return they provide you two files(mydomain.crt, gd_bundle.crt). mydomain.crt is your public key.

Certificate Chain

gd_bundle.crt is certification Chain file which godaddy provides you with your public key.your public key and certification chain file don't need any conversion but for the private key file you need to remove its password and convert it into pem with

#openssl rsa -in host.key -out private.pem 

and its all good to go for AWS.put private key.pem file content in aws private key section and put mydomain.crt file content in public key and put gd_bundle.crt content in certification chain Section. Conversion all depends upon from where you are getting your Certificate. if getting certificate from some other company i will recommend you to follow AWS Docs.

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/ElasticLoadBalancing/latest/DeveloperGuide/ssl-server-cert.html
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Here is a guide on how to get a Godaddy ssl certificate working on Amazon Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) http://cloudarch.co.uk/2011/10/elastic-load-balancer-ssl-setup-guide-pem-encoded-csr/#.UKFla2nGU_8

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lol i was just starting to write a post on our blog about this... My main problem was that i had a java keystone and i should have started with openssl. –  reformy Nov 13 '12 at 8:15
    
The link is now broken... –  robbyt Jan 19 '13 at 0:25
    
The link is back up! Hurray! –  robbyt May 2 '13 at 16:17

You want to convert mydomain.crt to mydomain.pem (the other two files are chain-of-trust files). You can use openssl on any unix or linux system to generate a pem file from a crt.

Since the certificate issuer has the private key, the only reason it should be asking you for one is if it is trying to generate a certificate. If you already have a certificate it should just use it. Check the documentation

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Thanks stark, I managed to convert mydomain.crt to mydomain.pem. Is that the private key or the public one? How do generate the other one? –  reformy Oct 20 '12 at 15:50
    
The private key is owned by the certificate issuer. You just get the signed cert. You would only have a private key if it is self-signed. –  stark Oct 20 '12 at 16:11

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