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I'm trying to make a macro with the following formula: (a^2/(a+b))*b, and I want to make sure that the there will be no dividing by zero.

#define SUM_A( x, y ) if( x == 0 || y == 0) { 0 } else { ( ( ( x * x ) / ( ( x ) + ( y ) ) ) * ( y ) )}

and then I call the macro inside main:

float a=40,b=10,result; 
result=SUM_A(a,b); 
printf("%f", result);

I've tried using brackets around the if function but I keep getting syntax errors before the if statement. I've also tried using return, but I read somewhere that you're not supposed to use that in define. Thanks for all help/input.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can not use if statement, because #define is interpret by the preprocessor, and the output would be

 result=if( x == 0 || y == 0) { 0 } else { ( ( ( x * x ) / ( ( x ) + ( y ) ) ) * ( y ) )}

which is wrong syntax.

But an alternative is to use ternary operator. Change your define to

#define SUM_A( x, y )  ((x) == 0 || (y) == 0 ? 0 : ( ( ( (x) * (x) ) / ( ( x ) + ( y ) ) ) * ( y ) ))

Remember to always put your define between parentheses, to avoid syntax error when replacing.

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Speaking of parentheses, shouldn't that be (x)*(x), (x)==0 and (y)==0? –  GuyGreer Oct 20 '12 at 14:26
    
indeed. Thanks for pointing that out. –  tomahh Oct 20 '12 at 14:27
    
Thank you very much, I had never heard of this operator before. –  Frey1337 Oct 20 '12 at 14:34
    
Think to validate an answer if one solved your problem. –  tomahh Oct 20 '12 at 14:42

if introduces a statement, not an expression. Use the "ternary" (conditional) operator:

#define SUM_A(x, y) (((x) == 0 || (y) == 0)? 0: ((((x) * (x)) / ((x) + (y))) * (y)))

Alternatively, make this an inline function:

inline float sum_a(float x, float y)
{
    if (x == 0 || y == 0)
        return 0;
    else
        return ((x * x) / (x + y)) * y;
}

This avoids the problem of multiple evaluation of x and/or y and is much more readable, but it does fix the types of x and y. You can also drop the inline and let the compiler decide whether inlining this function is worthwhile (inline is not a guarantee that it will perform inlining).

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The trouble with the function is that it forces you to use float as your datatype. Perhaps that's okay, but perhaps that's not. –  GuyGreer Oct 20 '12 at 14:29
    
@GuyGreer: good point, added that to the answer. –  larsmans Oct 20 '12 at 15:16

The problem is that an if statement is not an expression, and doesn't return a value. Besides, there is no good reason to use a macro in this case. In fact, it could cause very serious performance problems (depending on what you pass as macro arguments). You should use a function instead.

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