Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have encountered "c2512" error even if I declared the constructor. My code is like this: in my "first.h" file, I declared it like:

class myClass
{
public:
    tmpM ( cv::Mat& _model );
}

then in my "first.cpp" I did:

#include "first.h"
myClass::tmpM ( cv::Mat& _model )
{
    ...
}

Then I included this "first.h" in my "second.h", then included this "second.h" in my "third.h", and called this class in my "third.cpp" like this:

cv::Mat myMat ( height, width, CV_8UC3 );
tmpM aM ( myMat );

But this gives out an c2512 error, saying

no appropriate default constructor available

I indeed searched about this, and found I should build a default constructor by myself, and I tried to do it like this in my "first.h":

class myClass
{
public:
    tmpM ( cv::Mat& _model) {};
}

Then got an error saying:

function "myClass::tmpM" already has a body

I tried several other methods to do it but still couldn't solve it. I don't need to build a default constructor here I think, but still bothered with it. Could someone help me?

Edit

Ok, after your suggestions, I changed it into this form:

class myClass
{
public:
myClass(cv::Mat& _model ) : tmpM (_model)
{
}
private:
cv::Mat& tmpM;
};

Then in my "first.cpp", I got an error saying

declaration is incompatible

How could this be solved?

share|improve this question
    
tmpM that isn't a constructor..a constructor has the same name as the class name.. –  Anirudha Oct 20 '12 at 14:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem here appears to be that you've named your class something other than what you've named your constructor. They have to have the same name. Also, I'm presuming you wish the reference to the model you're passing in to be held by the object. If you want to preserve it as a reference it must be initialized in the the constructors initializer list.

You want:

class myClass
{
public:
    myClass(cv::Mat& _model ) : tmpM (_model)
    {
    }
private:
    cv::Mat& tmpM;
};
share|improve this answer

It should be:

class myClass
{
public:
    myClass(cv::Mat& _model ) : tmpM (_model)
    {
    }
};

Your version declares a function (well, attempts to, because it's invalid syntax - missing return type) called tmpM, it doesn't initialize the member.

You have to do it as above because the member the member of that type doesn't have a default constructor, so you must initialize it in the initialization list of the constructor.

share|improve this answer

default constructor is

class myClass {
public:
  myClass();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 he's not asking what a default constructor is. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 20 '12 at 14:26
    
but he have to know what is it –  Alexander Nekrasov Oct 20 '12 at 14:28
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Vikdor Oct 20 '12 at 14:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.