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I have some GUI-like elements in my WebGL scene which have to be displayed in plain white and not be affected by the lighting in scene.

The texture is a HTML5 canvas element, which has plain white background.

But when I render the canvas in the scene, as a texture, its affected by the lighting and becomes light gray.

How do I display this texture exactly with the same color of the canvas (plain white)?

I suspect the answer is in the fragment shader and playing already a while with it... and yes, I got once a plain color but nothing else, and I want to display some text over the background color.

Thanks!

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I got it! :D

In the fragment shader I added a boolean variable:

uniform bool uNoLights;

And use only the texture pixel information, to determine the final color, when it's set:

if (uNoLights) {
    gl_FragColor =  texture2D(uSampler, vec2(vTextureCoord.s, vTextureCoord.t));
}  else {
    gl_FragColor =  lights * texture2D(uSampler, vec2(vTextureCoord.s, vTextureCoord.t));
}
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Another option is to use a separate program for your GUI and your scene. – Kevin Reid Oct 20 '12 at 19:56
    
What do you mean with program, different fragment shader / shaders? – Ixx Oct 21 '12 at 20:44
    
My response got long, so I turned it into an answer. – Kevin Reid Oct 21 '12 at 21:36

Another option is to use a separate program for your GUI and your scene.

What do you mean with program, different fragment shader / shaders?

A program is the combination of a vertex shader and a fragment shader. You must have a gl.useProgram somewhere in your code; I'm talking about setting up two different programs and doing gl.useProgram inside your rendering loop, before the scene and before the GUI.

The advantage of this is that you can completely separate the programs, and avoid having any logic that is only needed for the scene wasting time in the GUI, and vice versa.

(The disadvantage is that switching programs itself has a cost, which might be more than the cost of the conditional in this case, but it is quite normal to switch programs within a single frame.)

In the end you have to measure to see which gives better performance for your use case.

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Ok, thanks for the additional information. In my case it's ok to let it in the same shader as the rest. – Ixx Oct 23 '12 at 16:26

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