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I'm using R5RS standart of Scheme implementation.

Now imagine you have to find out if an element '(2 3 4) is in a list '(1 2 3 4).

As for the example, and more strictly, you wish:

1. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '(1 2 3 4)) -> #f
2. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '(1 (2 3 4)) -> #t

Question: how to get that kind of behaviour, as in example 1?

Let me explain: when you search throught a list, you could use either car or cdr to get its parts. Now if you recursively go throught the list, you eventually get:

3. (cdr '(1 2 3 4)) -> '(2 3 4)
4. (cdr '(1 (2 3 4)) -> '((2 3 4))

So eventually, we got 2 lists. And you can see here, that sublist '(2 3 4) is contained by both results from 3 and 4.

Please see the contradiction of 3 and 4 with 1 and 2: while '(2 3 4) is not contained in '(1 2 3 4), recursive call of cdr returns '(2 3 4), which is equal to '(2 3 4) - and using equal? function, somewhere inside recursive calls, we eventually get #t for both 1 and 2:

5. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '(1 2 3 4)) -> #t
6. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '(1 (2 3 4)) -> #t

So how to get that kind of behaviour from 1? I want to have a function, which works with all different types of data. Here's my function, which works like 5 and 6 (throught should work as 1 and 2):

(define or (lambda (x y)
             (cond ((eq? x y) (eq? x #t))
                   (#t #t)
                   )
             )
  )

(define and (lambda (x y)
              (cond ((eq? x y) (eq? x #t))
                    (#t #f)
                    )
              )
  )

(define atom? (lambda (x)
                (not (pair? x))
                )
  )

(define length (lambda (x)
                       (cond ((eq? x '()) 0)
                             ((atom? x) 1)
                             (#t (+ (length (car x)) (length (cdr x))))
                             )
                       )
  )

(define equal? (lambda (x y)
                 (cond ((and (atom? x) (atom? y)) (eq? x y))
                       ((not (eq? (length x) (length y))) #f)
                       ((not (and (pair? x) (pair? y))) #f)
                       (#t (and (equal? (car x) (car y)) (equal? (cdr x) (cdr y))))
                       )
                 )
  )

(define is-in? (lambda (x y)
                 (cond ((equal? x y) #t)
                       (#t (cond ((pair? y) (or (is-in? x (car y)) (cond ((eq? (length y) 1) #f)
                                                                          (#t (is-in? x (cdr y)))
                                                                          )))
                                 (#t #f)
                                 )
                           )
                       )
                 )
  )

Update:

What I want is to have a general function, which can tell you if some object is inside another object. I name entities object to emphasize that the function should work with any input values, simple or complicated like hell.

Example usages:

1. (is-in? 1 '(1 2 3)) ;-> #t
2. (is-in? '(1) '(1 2 3)) ;-> #f
3. (is-in? '(2 . 3) '(1 2 . 3)) ;-> #f
4. (is-in? '(2 . 3) '(1 (2 . 3))) ;-> #t
5. (is-in? '2 '(1 2 . 3)) ;-> #t
6. (is-in? '(2) '(1 2 . 3)) ;-> #f
7. (is-in? '(1 2 (3 4 (5 6 . (7 . 8)) 9) 10 11 (12 . 13)) '(1 (2 3 ((4 ((6 (3 . ((1 2 (3 4 (5 6 . (7 . 8)) 9) 10 11 (12 . 13)))) 3) 4)) 5) 2))) ;-> #t
8. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '((1 (2 3 4)) (1 2 3 4))) ;-> #t
9. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '(1 2 3 4)) ;-> #f
10. (is-in? '(2 3 4) '(1 (2 3 4))) ;-> #t
11. (is-in? '(1) '(1)) ;-> #t
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all - why are you redefining and, or, equal? and length? those are built-in primitives. Also your definition of atom? is wrong, it should be:

(define (atom? x)
  (and (not (pair? x))
       (not (null? x))))

I guess you need to implement this from scratch as part of a homework. Let's see how that can be accomplished, fill-in the blanks to get your answer:

(define (is-in? ele lst)
  (or <???>                          ; trivial case: ele == list
      (member? ele lst)))            ; call helper procedure

(define (member? ele lst)
  (cond ((null? lst)                 ; if the list is empty
         <???>)                      ; then the element is not in the list
        ((atom? lst)                 ; if the list is not well-formed
         (equal? <???> <???>))       ; then test if ele == list
        (else                        ; otherwise
         (or (equal?  ele <???>)     ; test if ele == the 1st element in the list
             (member? ele <???>)     ; advance the recursion over the `car`
             (member? ele <???>))))) ; advance the recursion over the `cdr`

Notice that the second case in member? is needed because in the examples given there are malformed lists (ending in a non-null value). The above solution will correctly handle all of the examples provided in the question.

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Thanks for the answer, Oscar. Could you elaborate and show how to correctly implement member for yourself? This is actually my "homework", and the weirdness I described in the post doesn't let me finish it. Btw, try it like this: (is-in? '(2 3 4) '((1 (2 3 4)) (1 2 3 4))) -> #f. Still the result is wrong, as should be #t. Is it possible to have such a function as I want? –  Vadim Oct 20 '12 at 16:53
    
Add: your own function is similar to that Scott Hunter provided. Try it like this and it returns wrong answer: (is-in? '(2 3 4) '((1 (2 3 4)) (1 2 3 4))) –  Vadim Oct 20 '12 at 16:56
    
Please see updated question - I have added example usages, say if that's sufficient. –  Vadim Oct 20 '12 at 17:10
    
@Vadim check the new update, I simplified the answer. This is my final version, you should be able to find the solution on your own –  Óscar López Oct 20 '12 at 17:43
    
Thanks, will be tackling this now :) –  Vadim Oct 20 '12 at 17:55
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(define (is-in? e lst)
   (cond ((null? lst) #f) ; if list is empty, we failed
         ((eq? e (car lst)) #t) ; check 1st element of list
         ((list? (car lst)) (is-in? e (append (car lst) (cdr lst)))) ; search inside car if it is a list
         (#t (is-in? e (cdr lst))))) ; check rest of list

You can replace eq? with something more elaborate to handle other definitions of equality.

Note: this assumes that all sequences are lists; you'll have to tweak it to handle dotted-pairs that are not lists.

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Thanks for the example, but unfortunately it will produce false result on this: (is-in? '(2 3 4) '((1 (2 3 4)) (1 2 3 4))) -> #f –  Vadim Oct 20 '12 at 16:46
    
why an append? this is a rather inelegant solution, there's no need to create new lists if we're only looking for something inside a list!. Anyway, it fails with OP's examples. –  Óscar López Oct 20 '12 at 17:49
    
There are those who think tail-recursion is elegant. And except for (as noted) handling dotted-pairs, the only problem was a missing arg in the added call to is-in?. –  Scott Hunter Oct 20 '12 at 18:05
    
Compare this answer with my own - only list traversals are used. There's no need to create new lists when looking for something! that's inefficient and ugly, no matter the programming language –  Óscar López Oct 20 '12 at 18:08
    
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder," and what efficiencies you gain are (probably only partially) offset by tail recursive optimizations your (very clean, I won't deny) code can't take advantage of. Or, put another way: there's no need to create new stack frames... –  Scott Hunter Oct 20 '12 at 18:42
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