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I want to build a function in Ruby that takes in a string and compares it to a list of possibilities before returning some value or function. Here's a (possibly naive) way it could be written as a case statement:

a = 'unicorn'
case a
  when "gnome", "dwarf", "hobbit"
    "dwarf"
  when "dragon"
    puts "run away!"
  when "centaur", "unicorn"
    magical_equine_function(a)
  else
    false
end

My question is, how might one do the same thing using an approximate matching library like amatch, so that you could set an amatch value (like 2), and still get a match when you have a = "Unicorn" or a = "uncorn"?

Also, is there a cleaner and more maintainable way to write all this by seeding/comparing all the possible matches via a YAML file, rather than writing out a ton of case statements? I'm completely new to YAML, but was hoping that I might be able to just load a file like:

? 
  -"gnome"
  -"dwarf"
  -"hobbit"
: 
  -"dwarf"
? 
  -"dragon"
: 
  -puts "run away"
?
  -"centaur"
  -"unicorn"
: 
  -magical_equine_function(a)

And then just do the approximate matching against the loaded file. Is there a way to do that that wouldn't kill performance?

share|improve this question
1  
Case statements are an excellent way to do what you're trying to do. Personally, I'd use case, mixed with some regex, but that's my particular poison. You can also do that with a YAML file, but YOU will still have to write code to interpret the incoming data and turn it into conditional tests. –  the Tin Man Oct 20 '12 at 17:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few ways to skin this cat. One is with lambdas:

MATCHERS = [
  [/^gnome|dwarf|hobbit$/, lambda { |a| 'dwarf' }],
  ['dragon', lambda { |a| puts 'run away!' }],
  [/^centaur|unicorn$/, lambda { |a| magical_equine_function(a) }],
  [//, lambda { |a| false }],
]

This associates patterns (which may be either strings or regular expressions) with lambdas. The last matcher is special: It's a sentinel which matches anything. It stands in for the else clause in your example.

Here's the code that does the matching:

def match(a)
  MATCHERS.each do |pattern, f|
    return f[a] if pattern === a
  end
end

We use === so that either a string or a regexp can be used.

Here's how it's used:

p match('gnome')
# => "dwarf"

p match('dragon')
# => "run away!"
# => nil

p match('unicorn')
# => "equine unicorn"

p match('oddball')
# => false

You can do it with methods as well:

class Matcher

  def match(a)
    MATCHERS.each do |pattern, method|
      return send(method, a) if pattern === a
    end
  end

  private

  MATCHERS = [
    [/^gnome|dwarf|hobbit$/, :dwarf],
    ['dragon', :dragon],
    [/^centaur|unicorn$/, :equine],
    [//, :default],
  ]

  def dwarf(a)
    "dwarf"
  end

  def dragon(a)
    puts "run away!"
  end

  def equine(a)
    magical_equine_function(a)
  end

  def default(a)
    false
  end

  def magical_equine_function(a)
    "equine #{a}"
  end

end

And in use:

matcher = Matcher.new
    p matcher.match('gnome')
# => "dwarf"

# etc.

Using methods separates the code from the matching rules, which lets you put the matching rules in a file, if you want. This is the contents of match_rules:

---
- - !ruby/regexp /^gnome|dwarf|hobbit$/
  - :dwarf
- - dragon
  - :dragon
- - !ruby/regexp /^centaur|unicorn$/
  - :equine
- - !ruby/regexp //
  - :default

We don't have to make many changes to the Matcher class for for this to work:

require 'yaml'

class Matcher

  def initialize
    @matchers = YAML.load_file('match_rules')
  end

  def match(a)
    @matchers.each do |pattern, method|
      return send(method, a) if pattern === a
    end
  end

  # ...

end

Using send on data you to from a file allows whoever made the file to cause you to call any of the Matcher class's methods. To prevent against that, you can simply add a prefix to all of the methods used in the rules:

def matched_dragon(a)
  puts "run away!"
end

# etc.

And in the match method, add that prefix:

def match(a)
    @matchers.each do |pattern, method|
      return send("matched_#{method}", a) if pattern === a
    end
  end

Now only methods prefixed with "matched_" can be called by the match function.


Answer to follow-on question in comments:

The YAML for pattern being an array of strings is like this:

---
- - - gnome
    - dwarf
    - hobbit
  - :small_person
- - - dragon
  - :dragon
share|improve this answer
    
This is excellent. One thing--how to represent a list of strings in the yaml file, instead of using regex? I want to use approximate matching, since some of the inputs will often have tiny irregularities in the spelling ("Unicorn", "nicorn", "unicorln", etc.). In other words, what I'd like to do is alter the match function to something like: require 'amatch' def match(a) distance = Sellers.new(a) @matchers.each do |pattern, method| return send("matched_#{method}", a) if distance.match(pattern) <= 3 end end ...but need strings instead of regex for that to work. –  Michael Oct 21 '12 at 1:01
    
@Michael, I've included the YAML for that in the answer. –  Wayne Conrad Oct 21 '12 at 1:08

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