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Well,

The time has come, and I am trying to escape Larry Wall's nightmare and move from Perl to Python (for work). To this end I am putting myself through intensive self study to transform from a middle of the night cowboy coder, one man army, non-documenter, I am sure you know people like me(!), to a peaceful student of the Pythonic way. Also I am trying to be funny here, so please bear with me. :/

To this end I am working through converting common code and utilities I use on a daily basis from Perl to Python. This week I have been tooling with DateTime related library I wrote in Perl into a Python library which defines a class exposing the same contract, in particular creating DateTime objects in various timezones from the Olson database. Here is the example in Perl. I am having a difficult time understanding how the equivalent is done in Python. Please note I am writing this at 9:56 AM PST:

package MyDateTime;

use Moose;
use DateTime;

has day         => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Int');
has hour        => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Int');
has minute      => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Int');
has month       => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Int');
has second      => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Int');
has timezone    => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Str', required => 1);
has timestamp   => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Num', required => 1);
has year        => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Int');

around BUILDARGS => sub {
    my($orig, $class, $timezone, $timestamp) = @_;

    my $datetime = DateTime->from_epoch(
        epoch => $timestamp,
        time_zone => $timezone,
    );

    return $class->$orig(
        day         => sprintf("%02d",$datetime->day),
        hour        => sprintf("%02d",$datetime->hour),
        minute      => sprintf("%02d",$datetime->minute),
        month       => sprintf("%02d",$datetime->month),
        second      => sprintf("%02d",$datetime->second),
        timezone    => $timezone,
        timestamp   => $timestamp,
        year        => $datetime->year,
    );

};

__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;
1;

This creates a Perl DateTime object whose values correspond to the given timezone. For example, in a separate script:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use Moose;
use MyDateTime;

my $timestamp = time();

my $datetime = MyDateTime->new( 'America/Los_Angeles', $timestamp );
print $datetime->hour,"\n";

$datetime = MyDateTime->new( 'America/New_York', $timestamp );
print $datetime->hour,"\n";

Which prints:

09
12

Since is currently 9 am in LA and 12 pm in NYC.

The best I have been able to do in Python is as follows:

import datetime, pytz, time

class DateTime:
    def __init__(self, timezone, epoch):
        self.timezone = timezone
        self.epoch = epoch
        timezoneobject = pytz.timezone(timezone)
        datetimeobject = datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp( self.epoch )
        self.datetime = timezoneobject.localize(datetimeobject)

    def hour(self):
        return self.datetime.hour

if __name__=='__main__':
    epoch = time.time()
    dt = DateTime('America/Los_Angeles',epoch)
    print dt.datetime
    dt = DateTime('America/New_York',epoch)
    print dt.datetime

Which prints:

9
9

I have no idea where this is going wrong here! Is it possible to accomplish the same in Python using pytz? (I imagine it is!) If so please help!

Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

fromtimestamp can take timezone as its second argument. In that case, fromtimestamp interprets the timestamp as being relative to that timezone and returns a timezone-aware datetime object.


import datetime, pytz, time

utc = pytz.utc
class DateTime:
    def __init__(self, timezone, epoch):
        self.timezone = timezone
        self.epoch = epoch
        timezoneobject = pytz.timezone(timezone)
        self.datetime = datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(self.epoch, timezoneobject)

    def hour(self):
        return self.datetime.hour

if __name__=='__main__':
    epoch = time.time()
    dt = DateTime('America/Los_Angeles',epoch)
    print dt.hour()
    dt = DateTime('America/New_York',epoch)
    print dt.hour()

yields

10
13

By the way, naming your class DateTime may confuse other Python programmers (i.e. me!) since the class name sounds the same as the datetime module in the standard library. Different concepts should have easily distinguishable names. I've made countless errors mistyping one name when I meant another. You can save yourself some hassle later by giving your class a name clearly different from datetime.

share|improve this answer
    
Boom! Thank you!!! –  mobiusinversion Oct 20 '12 at 17:30
    
For sure, naming is key, any suggested python style? –  mobiusinversion Oct 20 '12 at 18:25
    
Most important is to be consistent, and to be compatible with the people you work with. Most people conform (to a greater or lesser extent) to PEP8. For class names, this means use CamelCase, but as you will note, the standard library itself breaks this one: datetime.datetime, collections.defaultdict, etc. –  unutbu Oct 20 '12 at 18:31

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