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Ok, recently I've been thinking about thread safety a lot and I was wondering why linked lists or deques are not thread safe.

Let's assume we have a simple linked list class like this:

class myLinkedList {
private:
    myLinkedList* next;
    int m_value;

public:
    myLinkedList() { next = NULL; m_value = 0; }
    void setValue(int value) { m_value = value; }
    int getValue() { return m_value; }
    void addNext(int value) { next = new myLinkedList; next->setValue(value); }
    myLinkedList* getNext() { return next; }
};

Now I just want to add new elements at the end and delete elements (read them first and then delete them) at the beginning. I basically just get the address of the first next, delete the first element and remember the next as my new first element. For adding new elements I only remember the last element and when I add a new element I just set a new next and remember my new next as the last element.

Where is the problem with threads in this scenario? Writers and readers shouldn't have any problems with this since they never interact with each other. It's not like using arrays or vectors (there I very well get why it causes problems).

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closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, Fraser, S.L. Barth, kiamlaluno, Florent Oct 21 '12 at 8:20

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Your code is wrong. If you write a working linked list you light find the answer to your question. –  alestanis Oct 20 '12 at 17:40
    
You correct about your linked list, but only because its not a linked list; its a memory leak in-waiting. –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '12 at 17:41
    
Your constructor doesn't leave your class in a fully initialized state. You've got a syntax error in addNext() — missing semicolon. You've not got a way to get at the data in the list — missing accessor getValue(). You've not written code to use this class. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 20 '12 at 17:44
    
This is by no means the class I haven't even written one it was just a theoretical question. Sorry for my sloppiness at writing the uncomplete sample. –  user238801 Oct 20 '12 at 17:50
    
The problem is not that it's incomplete. The problem is that it's absolutely wrong. –  alestanis Oct 20 '12 at 17:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The comments to your question are correct, your implementation will not work. However, to answer the actual question, here's a race condition in your code:

void addNext(int value) { next = new myLinkedList; next->setValue(value) }

Imagine that thread A executes:

next = new myLinkedList;

Now thread A gets preempted, and thread B also executes the same instruction. That means that next now doesn't point to wherever thread A wants it to point to, but instead it points to wherever thread B set it. Thread B continues the execution with:

next->setValue(value)

Soon after that (or even at the same time), thread A also executes the above.

Can you see the problem? Thread A calls next->setValue() on B's next and A's next is lost.

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So, very nice! Race condition identified, mutex needed ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 20 '12 at 18:00

Here is the code given in the question converted into a most basic exerciser program:

class myLinkedList {
private:
    myLinkedList* next;
    int m_value;

public:
    myLinkedList() : next(0), m_value(0) { }
    int  getValue() const { return m_value; }
    void setValue(int value) { m_value = value; }
    void addNext(int value) { next = new myLinkedList; next->setValue(value); }
    const myLinkedList *getNext() const { return next; }
};

#include <iostream>

static void print_list(const myLinkedList *rover)
{
    std::cout << "List:";
    while (rover != 0)
    {
        std::cout << " " << rover->getValue();
        rover = rover->getNext();
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    myLinkedList mine;
    print_list(&mine);
    mine.addNext(13);
    print_list(&mine);
    mine.addNext(14);
    print_list(&mine);
    mine.setValue(3);
    print_list(&mine);
    mine.addNext(15);
    print_list(&mine);
}

The output from this program is:

List: 0
List: 0 13
List: 0 14
List: 3 14
List: 3 15

As you can see, it isn't a normal linked list; it is a list of at most two items. Running the program (called ll for linked list) under valgrind, I get:

==31288== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==31288== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==31288== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==31288== Command: ll
==31288== 
List: 0
List: 0 13
List: 0 14
List: 3 14
List: 3 15
==31288== 
==31288== HEAP SUMMARY:
==31288==     in use at exit: 6,239 bytes in 36 blocks
==31288==   total heap usage: 36 allocs, 0 frees, 6,239 bytes allocated
==31288== 
==31288== LEAK SUMMARY:
==31288==    definitely lost: 48 bytes in 3 blocks
==31288==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31288==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31288==    still reachable: 6,191 bytes in 33 blocks
==31288==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31288== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==31288== 
==31288== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==31288== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 1 from 1)

If the code were a working linked list implementation, you'd have some timing issues in addNext().

Basically, you create a node with new and then need to hook it into the list. If another thread tries to do that at the same time, you have a timing window which could lead to inconsistent structures. For thread safety, you'd need to ensure mutual exclusion while the list was being modified.

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Yes I know that it only stores 2 elements addNext was never meant to add a new element to the list (at the end) it was meant to add a new element to the current list element. In order to add a new element to the list (at the end) you would have to get the last element and then call addNext and of course if you call addNext on a list element which already has a list element you will have a memory leak but that all was not the point I should have clarified this at the beginning although I thought it would be obvious. Nevertheless thanks for testing it, the last part helped :) –  user238801 Oct 20 '12 at 18:19

When you're using class instances of containers (std::list or whatever else) shared within several threads you'll need to protect concurrent access using a mutex or similar mechanism to get thread save behavior.

UPDATE

Constructs as you show for

 void setValue(int value) { m_value = value; }
 int getValue() { return m_value; }
 void addNext(int value) { next = new myLinkedList; next->setValue(value); }

aren't atomic operations. Therefore these aren't thread safe as long they're not used within a protected context. Same is true for STL containers like std::list.

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WHY? Where is the problem for lists that they require this. They don't get reinitialized when you delete elements etc. –  user238801 Oct 20 '12 at 17:48
    
Can the downvoter tell a particular reason or critics for the answer? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 20 '12 at 17:49
    
@Layne And what has this to do with thread safety?? The list content will be changed when deleting elements etc. and this state change needs to be protected if threads try to do it concurrently, period. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 20 '12 at 17:55

There are several thread-safety problems with something as seemingly simple as

next = new myLinkedList;

Depending on the hardware, the assignment to next can be torn by a thread switch; that is, part of the value might get written, then the processor changes to a different thread before the rest of the value gets written. Another thread would then see a value that's garbage.

With multiple processors, there's the additional problem that the value assigned to next gets written to the local cache of the processor that does the store. Other processors have their own caches, so they might not see the new value. Or they might see it, but not see the value written by the call to new myLinkedList, or maybe the value written by next->setValue(value);.

Or something else might go wrong.

Writing to a data location from one thread while another thread is reading or writing the same data location is a data race, and the behavior of a program with a data race is undefined. In practice that means that it will work just fine until you demo the program for your most important customer, when it will crash spectacularly.

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