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if you have any suggestions on how to modify the question title in order to be more descriptive, please feel free to say so .

Suppose you have a class method that returns an Object, is there a best practice or standard way of where to create the object within the method ? To clarify, see below :

public MyCustomObject myMethod(String arg1, String arg2){
    try{
        if (something){
            ...
        } else {
            ...
        }
    } catch ( SomeException e ){
        ...
    } catch ( SomeOtherException e ){
        ...
    }

    return myCustomObject;
}

MyCustomObject has an empty constructor, a constructor with 5 fields and getters/setters. I need to return a valid MyCustomObject in every case of the (simplified) flow above. Please do not focus on the control flow itself.

I think that I can either : a) Initialize a variable of type MyCustomObject with null in the beginning of the method. Assign a new MyCustomObject to it for every different case in the control flow. Return it in the end. b) Instantiate a MyCustomObject in the beginning by using the empty constructor. Modify the object with the setters for each of the cases in the flow.

Can you think of reasons why one of the above or a different way is preferable ?

Thanks

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You can't "instantiate an MyCustomObject as null" - you can declare a variable of type MyCustomObject and assign it a null reference as its initial value, but that's not instantiating a MyCustomObject. It's very important to differentiate between variables, references and objects. –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '12 at 18:05
    
Thanks for the comment ! I edited the question so it is more clear to everyone that I know what a variable, object and reference is so we do not need to focus on that :) –  ilektrojohn Oct 20 '12 at 18:17
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I prefer option 3 which you didn't mention: Create a new MyCustomObject for every different case in the control flow, and return it immediately. No variable required, usually:

if (foo) {
    return new MyCustomObject("foo");
}
if (bar) {
    return new MyCustomObject("x", "y");
}
// etc

This usually ends up with less nesting, and it's easier to read, in that as soon as you hit the return statement, you're done.

Some people hold on to the dogma of only having a single exit point, but I regard that as somewhat pointless these days - it made sense in languages where you needed to do clean-up before returning, but with garbage collection and finally blocks for other resource clean-up, it's unnecessary.

If you return as soon as you can, you can often end up with less nesting within the code - which greatly increases readability.

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so either:

MyCustomObject result = null;
if (something) {
    result = new MyCustomObject(a, b, c, d, e);
} else {
    result = new MyCustomObject(a, b, x, y, z);
}

Or

MyCustomObject result = new MyCustomObject();
if (something) {
    result.Name = arg1;
} else {
    result.Phone = arg2;
}

return result;

?

I can't really see why I should pick one over the other! I would probably use B to make sure I didn't forget initializing the result... but that's hardly a good reason I think.

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I have been using both methods for a long time, depending on what seemed better at the given time or how my mood was :D But, every time I get to a similar point, I do find myself spending time on thinking about the best option. So I thought I would just take some help figuring out if I need to figure it out once and for all –  ilektrojohn Oct 20 '12 at 18:25
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In my work, I personally prefer the first method (i.e., declaring your return variable, assigning it to null, and then allowing the actual logic of the program to instantiate an appropriate object as needed).

The reason I find this more useful is because wherever you're calling the method from probably wants to know if something went wrong in the creation of the object, or whether a useful one was created at all. It's much easier to perform a null check than to try to figure out if an instantiated object is a dummy object. You'll find that null checking is usually a huge part of the control flow of a complex program. If I always return an object, regardless of what happens, my checker will have to be more complicated.

For example, let's say I have a method called readItem() which returns a custom Item object. In this readItem(), it goes and fetches some data from a table and populates the Item with it. Now, let's say nothing goes wrong in the processing of readItem() that warrants throwing an exception, but the criteria for the Item we want read simply isn't in the table (for example, maybe we have supplied an item ID for which no item exists or something). Then if I return an instantiated Item rather than null, this is much harder to figure out.

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Option 1:

MyCustomObject myCustomObj = null;

for( index > list of cases ){

    myCustomObj = myMethod(param1, param2);

}

Perfect : You are declaring the variable once and modifying the value.

Option 2:

for( index > list of cases ){

    MyCustomObject myCustomObj = myMethod(param1, param2);

}

Good : You are redeclaring the variable again and again and modifying the value.

Option 3:

MyCustomObject myCustomObj = new MyCustomObject();

for( index > list of cases ){

    myCustomObj = myMethod(param1, param2);

}

Bad : You are wasting memory in the first line , because the reference is nowhere used.But still causes no harm

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I don't view the first option as "perfect" - we're assigning a null value to start with, which has no purpose. I see no point in having the variable at all - see my answer for my reasoning... –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '12 at 18:22
    
Yeh.. u dont have a spare variable here.. But the object is in hotline here. If in case, he wants do something with the object, say a simple comparison, he can stop it on the way.. –  madhairsilence Oct 20 '12 at 18:30
    
You can do that in situations where you need to with my approach too... you can still use a local variable when it's useful, without having one variable which is in scope for the whole method. –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '12 at 18:33
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