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I am reading a file (disk images and /dev/sda and likes) in python using binary mode. I am reading the first sector (512 bytes) and am trying to print disk information (ref: Wikipedia Articles).

To interpret things like the 32bit LBA of first absolute sector in the partition, I am doing things like -

def int32(bytes):
    return int(bytes[3]<<24|bytes[2]<<16|bytes[1]<<8|bytes[0])

def int16(bytes):
    return int(bytes[1]<<8|bytes[0])

print('LBA:',int32(partitionEntry[8:12]))

Is there native wat to do this in python? As typecasting intVar=(int*)someBasePointer in C


Added after marking as answered:

Is there a way to do this for odd bit structure? Like the CHS. C (cylinders) are 10 bits 8 bits from one byte and 2 from the other byte. My current approach for this is

def getCHS(bytes):
    c=bytes[1]&3<<8|bytes[2]
    h=bytes[0]
    s=bytes[1]&63
    return {'c':c,'s':s,'h':h}
share|improve this question
1  
Look at struct module in Python: docs.python.org/library/struct.html (examples: docs.python.org/library/struct.html#examples) – Alok Singhal Oct 20 '12 at 18:14
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want the struct.unpack() function.

import struct

def int32(some_bytes):
    return struct.unpack("i", some_bytes)[0]

def int16(some_bytes):
    return struct.unpack("h", some_bytes)[0]

If you're reading from a system that uses different endian values than the current system, you may need to specify the endianness in the format string as well.

(i and h are the signed int versions; if you want unsigned, use I and H)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This works! I am looking into the documentation of struct. Is there a way to do this for odd bit structure? Like the CHS. C (cylinders) are 10 bits 8 bits from one byte and 2 from the other byte. – Lord Loh. Oct 20 '12 at 18:32
    
struct doesn't support partial bytes, no. You'll still have to do that manipulation yourself. – Amber Oct 20 '12 at 18:37
    
Thanks. That is useful to know outright than wondering if I am reinventing the wheel. – Lord Loh. Oct 20 '12 at 18:38

For simple 1-, 2-, or 4-byte fields, your best bet may be struct.unpack. Try something like:

def int32(bytes):
    return struct.unpack("i", bytes[:4])[0]

You might need to specify the endian with "<i" or ">i" as the format string.

However, more unusual field widths require masking and/or bitshifting. Your approach works well; alternatively, you could unpack an unsigned type of sufficient size, but it doesn't save much work:

def getCHS(bytes):
    h, r = struct.unpack("BH", bytes[:3])
    c = r & 0x3F
    s = r >> 10
    return {'c':c,'s':s,'h':h}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this will return a tuple with one value, not the individual value. Also, silently slicing the input set of bytes isn't going to buy you much and will mask accidental errors that input more data. It'd be better to just assume you're getting a 4-byte string input. – Amber Oct 20 '12 at 18:21
    
Thank you. This works! I am looking into the documentation of struct. Is there a way to do this for odd bit structure? Like the CHS. C (cylinders) are 10 bits 8 bits from one byte and 2 from the other byte. – Lord Loh. Oct 20 '12 at 18:30
    
@Amber: Good point; I've mostly used unpack for multiple fields, and forgot about that detail. – eswald Oct 22 '12 at 13:51

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