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I have started working with dirent.h library and I came across a very useful member of "struct dirent" structer which struct dirent *p->d_name in my book. But unfortunatly it doesn't states any other members of this structure;

I was wondering what else are the members of this structure and what are they used for?

Regards

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I assume you're on Linux. In that case, simply read the dirent.h manual page (man dirent.h). –  Nikos C. Oct 20 '12 at 18:25
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The structure, struct dirent refers to directory entry.

http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Directory-Entries.html

In linux it is defined as:

struct dirent {
    ino_t          d_ino;       /* inode number */
    off_t          d_off;       /* offset to the next dirent */
    unsigned short d_reclen;    /* length of this record */
    unsigned char  d_type;      /* type of file; not supported
                                   by all file system types */
    char           d_name[256]; /* filename */
};

refer: man readdir

Or just look for "dirent.h" in the include directory.

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There are only two members (from wikipedia):

  • ino_t d_ino - file serial number
  • char d_name[] - name of entry (will not exceed a size of NAME_MAX)

Take a look at the unix spec as well.

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There might be some other (implementation or system specific) members, but you should not use them for POSIX portability reasons. –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 20 '12 at 20:23
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in addition to above answer of @Binyamin Sharet:

 off_t d_off - file offset
    unsigned short int d_reclen - length of the dirent record
    unsigned short int d_namlen - length of name
    unsigned int d_type - type of file
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These should not be used. They are implementation-specific and not defined by POSIX. You should probably update your answer to reflect that. –  Nikos C. Oct 20 '12 at 18:30
    
how d_type works? –  Naruto Oct 20 '12 at 18:33
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