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If you're like me, you think CodeIgniter is pretty nice. You also probably hate typing _model every time you load or call a method or property from your models, because it's ugly and time-consuming.

I've been searching for a solution to this for a couple hours with no luck - so I put together a quick fix.

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2 Answers 2

Take a look at the loader class documentation.

Say you've got a class called page_model, you would typically load and use it like this:

$this->load->model('page_model'); 
$this->page_model->function();`

If you want to avoid typing _model every time you can do this:

$this->load->model('page_model', 'page');    
$this->page->function();

When I first started using CodeIgniter I always did this. Now after using CI for several years and a number of websites, I regret that decision.

It's harder to tell what's going on when looking at the code. Having the _model as part of the code that calls the model function removes any ambiguity. For example, in the above function call is page a library or a model?

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If I'd seen that it's possible I would have gone that route. It doesn't address ugly filenames, though, and it doesn't reduce the amount of text needed to load the model in the first place. Under what circumstances are you finding that level of ambiguity punishing? –  sudowned Oct 20 '12 at 19:26
    
Mostly it's when going back to a controller written more than a week ago, or reviewing code written by a co-worker. While it's simple to scroll to wherever the model was loaded and see what something is, it's nice to be able to identify models as such just by looking at the function call. –  bradym Oct 20 '12 at 19:30
    
I can see that, actually. How big is the codebase? –  sudowned Oct 20 '12 at 22:35
    
We have 100+ sites running on CodeIgniter, so it depends on the individual site. Most important thing I've learned working on so many sites is how quickly patterns propagate across sites... good or bad. –  bradym Oct 20 '12 at 22:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is because CodeIgniter does not support namespaces. While there have been discussions of namespace support in CI for some time, support in the stock codebase is still forthcoming.

The solution? Prefix your controllers instead! In typical usage, you're unlikely to need to type the name of the controller more than once per file.

First edit application/config/routes and add the following line after all the other routes:

$route['(:any)'] = "c_$1";

With this rule, you route the first segment of the URI to the matching controller with your prefix. So that:

http://www.domain.com/fishsticks

maps to the following controller:

c_fishsticks

Next, rename your controller files with this prefix, as well as altering the class names inside to match.

That's it! Now you can name your models with relative freedom. You can rename your models at your leisure, but don't forget that you need to change each model's filename, each model's class name, as well as all references to each model. This is easily the most time-consuming step, but on the plus side you don't have to do it all at once.

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1  
Seems like a lot more effort than typing six extra characters occasionally. –  bradym Oct 20 '12 at 19:16
    
If it bothered me on the basis of effort alone, maybe. In my opinion it adds a lot of ugly heft to the code which doesn't need to be there. In my experience, though, it simply makes no sense to have that six-character productivity tax on the classes I type most frequently. –  sudowned Oct 20 '12 at 19:23
    
Well, to each his own. Happy coding! :) –  bradym Oct 20 '12 at 19:26
    
Happier now, thanks. :) And I hope I didn't come across as confrontational, I'm most interested in finding the best way to deal with this that doesn't leave me muttering under my breath. –  sudowned Oct 20 '12 at 19:28

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