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There are n people numbered from 1 to n. I have to write a code which produces and print all different combinations of k people from these n. Please explain the algorithm used for that.

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See stackoverflow.com/questions/127704/… for a list of algorithms. I don't want to take you the joy of converting them to C++ :) –  halex Oct 20 '12 at 19:17
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3 Answers

I assume you're asking about combinations in combinatorial sense (that is, order of elements doesn't matter, so [1 2 3] is the same as [2 1 3]). The idea is pretty simple then, if you understand induction / recursion: to get all K-element combinations, you first pick initial element of a combination out of existing set of people, and then you "concatenate" this initial element with all possible combinations of K-1 people produced from elements that succeed the initial element.

As an example, let's say we want to take all combinations of 3 people from a set of 5 people. Then all possible combinations of 3 people can be expressed in terms of all possible combinations of 2 people:

comb({ 1 2 3 4 5 }, 3) =
{ 1, comb({ 2 3 4 5 }, 2) } and
{ 2, comb({ 3 4 5 }, 2) } and
{ 3, comb({ 4 5 }, 2) }

Here's C++ code that implements this idea:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

vector<int> people;
vector<int> combination;

void pretty_print(const vector<int>& v) {
  static int count = 0;
  cout << "combination no " << (++count) << ": [ ";
  for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) { cout << v[i] << " "; }
  cout << "] " << endl;
}

void go(int offset, int k) {
  if (k == 0) {
    pretty_print(combination);
    return;
  }
  for (int i = offset; i <= people.size() - k; ++i) {
    combination.push_back(people[i]);
    go(i+1, k-1);
    combination.pop_back();
  }
}

int main() {
  int n = 5, k = 3;

  for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) { people.push_back(i+1); }
  go(0, k);

  return 0;
}

And here's output for N = 5, K = 3:

combination no 1:  [ 1 2 3 ] 
combination no 2:  [ 1 2 4 ] 
combination no 3:  [ 1 2 5 ] 
combination no 4:  [ 1 3 4 ] 
combination no 5:  [ 1 3 5 ] 
combination no 6:  [ 1 4 5 ] 
combination no 7:  [ 2 3 4 ] 
combination no 8:  [ 2 3 5 ] 
combination no 9:  [ 2 4 5 ] 
combination no 10: [ 3 4 5 ] 
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In Python, this is implemented as itertools.combinations

https://docs.python.org/2/library/itertools.html#itertools.combinations

In C++, such combination function could be implemented based on permutation function.

The basic idea is to use a vector of size n, and set only k item to 1 inside, then all combinations of nchoosek could obtained by collecting the k items in each permutation. Though it might not be the most efficient way require large space, as combination is usually a very large number. It's better to be implemented as a generator or put working codes into do_sth().

Code sample:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main(void) {

  int n=5, k=3;

  // vector<vector<int> > combinations;
 vector<int> selected;
 vector<int> selector(n);
 fill(selector.begin(), selector.begin() + k, 1);
 do {
     for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
      if (selector[i]) {
            selected.push_back(i);
      }
     }
     //     combinations.push_back(selected);
         do_sth(selected);
     copy(selected.begin(), selected.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "));
     cout << endl;
     selected.clear();
 }
 while (prev_permutation(selector.begin(), selector.end()));

  return 0;
}

and the output is

0 1 2 
0 1 3 
0 1 4 
0 2 3 
0 2 4 
0 3 4 
1 2 3 
1 2 4 
1 3 4 
2 3 4 

This solution is actually a duplicate with Generating combinations in c++

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That function is only applicable to enumerating full permutations of a sequence -- that is, permutations of n items from n available. The OP is asking for combinations, not permutations, and each combination should only have k of the n available items. –  Sneftel May 14 at 19:47
    
thanks! corrected. –  Ning May 15 at 20:50
    
That's still going to produce permutations, not combinations. That is, each k-combination will be repeated (n-k)! times, in a different order. –  Sneftel May 15 at 21:18
    
this should generate combinations, as for each permutation, a different set of k items would be selected. –  Ning May 16 at 17:59
    
You're right -- I'd forgotten that next_permutation properly handles duplicated values. –  Sneftel May 17 at 8:26
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I have written a class in C# to handle common functions for working with the binomial coefficient, which is the type of problem that your problem falls under. It performs the following tasks:

  1. Outputs all the K-indexes in a nice format for any N choose K to a file. The K-indexes can be substituted with more descriptive strings or letters. This method makes solving this type of problem quite trivial.

  2. Converts the K-indexes to the proper index of an entry in the sorted binomial coefficient table. This technique is much faster than older published techniques that rely on iteration. It does this by using a mathematical property inherent in Pascal's Triangle. My paper talks about this. I believe I am the first to discover and publish this technique.

  3. Converts the index in a sorted binomial coefficient table to the corresponding K-indexes. I believe it is also faster than the other solutions.

  4. Uses Mark Dominus method to calculate the binomial coefficient, which is much less likely to overflow and works with larger numbers.

  5. The class is written in .NET C# and provides a way to manage the objects related to the problem (if any) by using a generic list. The constructor of this class takes a bool value called InitTable that when true will create a generic list to hold the objects to be managed. If this value is false, then it will not create the table. The table does not need to be created in order to perform the 4 above methods. Accessor methods are provided to access the table.

  6. There is an associated test class which shows how to use the class and its methods. It has been extensively tested with 2 cases and there are no known bugs.

To read about this class and download the code, see Tablizing The Binomial Coeffieicent.

It should be pretty straight forward to port the class over to C++.

The solution to your problem involves generating the K-indexes for each N choose K case. For example:

int NumPeople = 10;
int N = TotalColumns;
// Loop thru all the possible groups of combinations.
for (int K = N - 1; K < N; K++)
{
   // Create the bin coeff object required to get all
   // the combos for this N choose K combination.
   BinCoeff<int> BC = new BinCoeff<int>(N, K, false);
   int NumCombos = BinCoeff<int>.GetBinCoeff(N, K);
   int[] KIndexes = new int[K];
   BC.OutputKIndexes(FileName, DispChars, "", " ", 60, false);
   // Loop thru all the combinations for this N choose K case.
   for (int Combo = 0; Combo < NumCombos; Combo++)
   {
      // Get the k-indexes for this combination, which in this case
      // are the indexes to each person in the problem set.
      BC.GetKIndexes(Loop, KIndexes);
      // Do whatever processing that needs to be done with the indicies in KIndexes.
      ...
   }
}

The OutputKIndexes method can also be used to output the K-indexes to a file, but it will use a different file for each N choose K case.

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