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I am creating a program to convert from binary, decimal, hex, and oct to any one of those options. For hex, I need a way to format values greater than 9 into one of A, B, C, D, E, F. Since this will repeated in several functions, I decided to make the following function:

char hexRepresentation(double n){
    if(n > 9){
        if(n==10) return 'A';
        if(n==11) return 'B';
        if(n==12) return 'C';
        if(n==13) return 'D';
        if(n==14) return 'E';
        if(n==15) return 'F';
    }

    return (char)n;

}

However, when I try to compile, I receive the error "conflicting types for 'hexRepresentation'"

I'm utterly new at C, coming from Java, and am banging my head against a wall over what should be the simplest things to implement. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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2  
What would it return if you passed in 5.6? Or even an integral value under 10? (char)5 is not '5'. –  chris Oct 20 '12 at 20:46
1  
Apart from the questionable decision to have it accept doubles, did you declare the function before use? If you're coming from Java, you may have forgotten that. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 20 '12 at 20:49
    
I'm not even concerned with that at the moment. I'm getting n as a double from other functions - specifically from math.h's pow(). I'm only working with integers so far. –  Thomas Preston Oct 20 '12 at 20:50
    
@DanielFischer, forgive me; like I said, utterly new. I think I know what you mean. You're referring to naming other functions before main(), correct? I have other functions that, well, function without having done that. –  Thomas Preston Oct 20 '12 at 20:52
1  
No need to apologise for being new. As for the lack of declaration, in old versions of C (pre C99), using a function not previously declared provided an implicit declaration of the function with return type int. Many compilers still work in some kind of pre-C99 mode by default and accept implicit function declarations. But if you later declare and define the function with a return type incompatible with int, you get exactly such an incompatible type error. With gcc, in -std=c99 mode, you'll get a warning for an implicitly declared function, and an error if you add -pedantic-errors. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 20 '12 at 20:58

3 Answers 3

You don't get a declaration kind-of error because in C, when you do not forward declare a function most compilers assume an extern function that returns an int type. Actually the compiler should warn you about this (most do). Then later on when the compiler actually reaches the function implementation it finds a different return type, in this case a char, and then throws the "conflicting type" error. Just forward declare all the functions to avoid this kind of errors.

About what would be the best way somthing like following code woudl yield a similar result:

if (n > 9)
{
   return('A' + (n - 10));
}
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Just create one stack ( for char) which has push and pop functions. I am not returning the value just printing it there in the same function. (have implemented for integral values only)

#define max 100
char a[max];

void hex(int n)
{
 while(n>0)
 {
 int rem = n%16;
 if (rem<10)
   push(rem+'0');
 elsif(rem >=10 && rem <16)
   {
     switch(rem)
     {
       case 10:
         push('A');break;
         case 11:
         push('B');break;
         case 12:
         push('C');break;
         case 13:
         push('D');break;
         case 14:
         push('E');break;
         case 15:
         push('F');break;
     }
    else
       n=n/16;
   }
   }
   i=0;
   while(top>-1)
     a[i++]=pop();
   i=0;
   while(a[i]!='\0')
     printf("%c",a[i++]);
}

Is it helpful ?

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Whatever you are doing in the code posted, you are not using double datatype at all, within the function. And from the function return type, it appears you will never see the return value >127.

This code highlights some issues:(This is just illustrative)

char hexRepresentation(double n){
    if(n > 9){//comparing (double>int). Bad.
        if(n==10) return 'A';
        if(n==11) return 'B';
        if(n==12) return 'C';//You wrote if(double == int). Bad.
        if(n==13) return 'D';
        if(n==14) return 'E';
        if(n==15) return 'F';
    }

    return (char)n; //again unsafe downgrade from 8 bytes double to 1 byte char.
}

Even if you fix your compiler error, you may not get the desired results always, due to such dangerous usage of datatype in the function.

To know why its bad, look here:

http://www.cygnus-software.com/papers/comparingfloats/Comparing%20floating%20point%20numbers.htm

I would use fabs(n) instead of n everywhere in that function body.

And the error "conflicting types for 'hexRepresentation'" will be shown when there exists a prior declaration or definition of the same named function hexRepresentation before this function definition. Also, if you do not declare a function and it only appears after being called, it is automatically assumed to be int by the compiler.

So, declare and define your function before main() or declare before main() and define the function anywhere else in the file, but, with the same function prototype.

Do:

 char hexRepresentation(double); //Declaration before main
 main()
 {
   ...
 }
 char hexRepresentation(double n){//Definition after main
 ...
 }

Or

 char hexRepresentation(double n){ //Declaration and definition before main
  ...
 }

 main()
 {
    ...
 }
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