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I want to access an object's own function from a jQuery method which fails.

function obj(){    
    this.send = function(){
        $.get("send.php",null,function(data){
            this.success();
        }).error(function(){ this.fail(); });
    }
    this.fail = function(){
        alert("fail");
    }
}

var o = new obj();
o.send();

Gives this error: TypeError: this.fail is not a function

How to access function fail inside jQuery?

share|improve this question
1  
Why downvote this? Sure this has been asked a hundred of times and is a simple scoping issue, but still. – Fabrício Matté Oct 20 '12 at 23:14
1  
Also, you were calling the constructor's .send method (which is a syntax error), I assume you had a problem with the renaming so I fixed your code to call the instance's send method. – Fabrício Matté Oct 20 '12 at 23:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

On line 5, failis not called by the same object, so thisdoes not have the same reference, and therefore no method fail. We say that you change context.

The trick is to use a variable often called self or that or _this. I prefer self.

function obj(){    
    var self = this;
    this.send = function(){
        $.get("send.php",null,function(data){
            this.success();
        }).error(function(){ self.fail(); });
    }
    this.fail = function(){
        alert("fail");
    }
}

It should make it, and yes, javascript looks like a pity language. But once you overcome the few problems, you will love the possibilities.

share|improve this answer
3  
self is actually a reference to the current document's window object and by declaring a variable with that name you're shadowing the global self. Not that it's a very significant thing, but worth noting that the global self won't be accessible inside the instance then (except by window.self/window['self'] of course). – Fabrício Matté Oct 20 '12 at 23:23
1  
okay, so now I prefer that :) ; thought self is a better word to explain the stuff. I keep self in the code for documentation, but I won't use it. Maybe _self, but I intensively use the underscore library. – Nicolas Zozol Oct 20 '12 at 23:25
    
Thank You @Nicolas. – Sukanta Paul Oct 20 '12 at 23:25
    
My codebase currently uses self. Luckily checking the code in strict mode with jslint will pick up undeclared references to a self object, making it harder to get into the scrape @Fabrizio describes. – FruitBreak Jan 11 '13 at 9:55

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