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I have the following code inside $(document).ready to dynamically add padding to the main stage depending on what menus are present. This works well, however, when the page loads, it renders everything, then the content 'jumps' down b/c the dynamic padding is kicking in. How do I get this to calculate and set the padding prior to the stage content getting loaded, so the user doesn't see the content jump into its new position?

Thanks for any help on this!

$(document).ready(function() {

    menuMain = $('#main-menu').outerHeight();
    menuSub = $('#sub-menu').outerHeight();
    menuTray = $('#info-tray').outerHeight();
    stageGutter = 30;
    stagePad = menuMain+menuSub+menuTray+stageGutter;

    if ($('#sub-menu').length != 0) {
        $('#info-tray').css('margin-top','30px');
    }

    $('#stage').css('padding-top',stagePad+'px');

});
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Where are you loading jquery? On the top or the bottom of your scripts? Why can you do this using CSS? –  Robert Smith Oct 20 '12 at 23:40
    
At the top. Each page can dynamically have 1 to 3 menus, so I am looking for a more efficient way to control the stage padding on the fly. –  Chris Oct 20 '12 at 23:46
    
In this case, at the top is good but as you may know, it's recommended to put it at the bottom. At any rate, $(document).ready() is waiting until the DOM has finished to create all elements. Uhm... I was suggesting to use $(window).load() but that only works with images, frames, etc once the page has loaded. Why don't you copy a bit of code to see whether it's a problem that truly requires javascript. Javascript is going to have "jumps". –  Robert Smith Oct 20 '12 at 23:51
    
Thanks for your advice. How would you achieve this without JS? I mean - deliver page specific #stage padding based on how many menus there are? –  Chris Oct 21 '12 at 0:13
    
It's hard to give a suggestion without looking at your specific situation but for menus, floats or inline-block li elements work great. They will accommodate themselves in their parent container, but maybe you have a very special kind of menu. –  Robert Smith Oct 21 '12 at 0:24
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