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PHP: show a number to 2 decimal places

How do I cast an integer, let's say $i=50 to a float with two decimal values: $m=50.00? I have tried (float)$i but nothing happens.

EDIT:

I need to make $i == $m so that returns TRUE;

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Another users that changes his entire question after answers were posted, making old answers useless, even wrong. For the question. $i==$m returns true, so please provide your real code. Are you sure you are not comparing a string to a number? –  clentfort Oct 21 '12 at 0:09
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marked as duplicate by tereško, Lusitanian, vascowhite, j0k, Sirko Oct 22 '12 at 15:00

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're just using the regular equality operator (==) instead of the type-safe equality operator (===) you shouldn't have any problems.

Comparing a double to an int with the same values:

$i = 20;
$m = 20.00;

gettype($i); // integer
gettype($m); // double

$i == $m; // true;
$i === $m; // false, $m is a double and $i is an integer.

If we would like to fix that, however, we just need to do:

$i = (double)$i;
gettype($i); // double
$i === $m; // true!
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+1 on the type .. but still would not return 50.00 as float .... see codepad.viper-7.com/CCAoaW ... –  Baba Oct 21 '12 at 0:17
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Why the interest in how var_dump() prints? It's only debug messaging, it should print the value in the most simple way. The OP was interested in how to make a floating point number (float and double are the same in php (explained)) be equal to an integer. (float)$i and (double)$i both return floats in var_dump() and double in gettype(). –  nyson Oct 21 '12 at 0:24
    
The original question was how to print an float that has no decimal part so it shows zeroes there. Then the authored changed the question. And this Baba guy does not understand what datatypes are and how they work in PHP. –  clentfort Oct 21 '12 at 0:38
    
Then casting isn't really related to the the question. If I'm not wrong, neither number_format() or sprintf() cares about the type of the arguments, as long as it's a number. –  nyson Oct 21 '12 at 0:45
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round((float)$i, 2) Should do the trick.

The round function is built in and rounds a given float to the number of decimal places specified in the given argument.

Ahh yes, number_format($var, 2) is good as well !

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number_format and sprintf are both better than this solution. –  clentfort Oct 20 '12 at 23:53
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@clenfort why do you think so? –  menislici Oct 20 '12 at 23:56
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number_format returns string not float .... –  Baba Oct 20 '12 at 23:57
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I disagree: codepad.viper-7.com/Va7w4j –  PhpMyCoder Oct 21 '12 at 0:34
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For floating point numbers the number of decimal digits is a formatting property, that is the number itself doesn't know about those things. A float 50 is stored as an exact integer 50. You need to format the number (using sprintf for example) to be written with decimal digits.

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if $i=50 is stored as $m=50.00 than $i==$m would return TRUE. However, that's not the case in my application, it returns FALSE. –  menislici Oct 20 '12 at 23:53
    
It's not. But floating-point numbers that contain integers can represent those integers exactly. Read up on how they look in memory, you'll notice the same. Decimal numbers, like .NET supports, for example, store their precision as well, which is why you can have a decimal number with 2 digits of precision. But not a normal float. –  Јοеу Oct 20 '12 at 23:57
    
$i==$m returns true. $i===$m returns false since the === operator also compares the datatypes which are int and float in your case, while the == will automatically convert the int to a float for the comparison. The actual variable will not be effected. –  clentfort Oct 21 '12 at 0:01
    
Uhm, of course it's a valid floating-point number ??? tell me how php would show 50.00 as float ... –  Baba Oct 21 '12 at 0:02
    
@Joey Next time do your research more on PHP .. there is no way to get 50.00 as float all you get is 50 in php. You can only get it has a string –  Baba Oct 21 '12 at 0:20
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