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I have one table vwuser. I want join this table with the table valued function fnuserrank(userID). So I need to cross apply with table valued function:

SELECT *
FROM vwuser AS a
CROSS APPLY fnuserrank(a.userid)

For each userID it generates multiple records. I only want the last record for each empid that does not have a Rank of Term(inated). How can I do this?

Data:

HistoryID empid  Rank  MonitorDate
1          A1     E1    2012-8-9
2          A1     E2    2012-9-12 
3          A1     Term  2012-10-13
4          A2     E3     2011-10-09
5          A2     TERM   2012-11-9 

From this 2nd record and 4th record must be selected.

share|improve this question
    
What criteria are you using to decide "last record"? –  Adam Wenger Oct 21 '12 at 0:28
    
There is one monitordate colmn, it must be maximum –  user1599392 Oct 21 '12 at 0:38
    
I have also given data in my question and what I want –  user1599392 Oct 21 '12 at 0:43
    
Wouldn't you want the 3rd and 4th records, since the MonitorDate for 3 is in October, and the second record's date is only September? –  Adam Wenger Oct 21 '12 at 1:11
    
No, I want only 2nd and 4th record. This is because I dont want terminated records. I want records before this. i.e last active records –  user1599392 Oct 21 '12 at 1:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In SQL Server 2005+ you can use this Common Table Expression (CTE) to determine the latest record by MonitorDate that doesn't have a Rank of 'Term':

WITH EmployeeData AS
(
   SELECT *
      , ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY empId, ORDER BY MonitorDate DESC) AS RowNumber
   FROM vwuser AS a
   CROSS APPLY fnuserrank(a.userid)
   WHERE Rank != 'Term'
)
SELECT *
FROM EmployeeData AS ed
WHERE ed.RowNumber = 1;

Note: The statement before this CTE will need to end in a semi-colon. Because of this, I have seen many people write them like ;WITH EmployeeData AS...

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I don't think you have to use a CTE. You could just use a nested SELECT like SELECT t1.* FROM (SELECT a,b,c FROM xyz) t1. However, the ROW_NUMBER() statement does require SQL Server 2005 or higher. Edit: As does APPLY, I believe. –  Bacon Bits Oct 21 '12 at 1:16
    
@BaconBits You are correct, you do not have to use a CTE. I prefer how they look over nested selects though, which is why I use them in my answers when the OP Tags SQL Server 2005+ (either option will function the same in this case) –  Adam Wenger Oct 21 '12 at 1:20
    
CTE and rownumber, left join, or max subqueries all work –  Brian White Oct 21 '12 at 1:25

You'll have to play with this. Having trouble mocking your schema on sqlfiddle.

Select bar.*
from 
(
SELECT *
FROM vwuser AS a
CROSS APPLY fnuserrank(a.userid)
where rank != 'TERM'
) foo
left join 
(
SELECT *
FROM vwuser AS b
CROSS APPLY fnuserrank(b.userid)
where rank != 'TERM'
) bar
on foo.empId = bar.empId
  and foo.MonitorDate > bar.MonitorDate
where bar.empid is null

I always need to test out left outers on dates being higher. The way it works is you do a left outer. Every row EXCEPT one per user has row(s) with a higher monitor date. That one row is the one you want. I usually use an example from my code, but i'm on the wrong laptop. to get it working you can select foo., bar. and look at the results and spot the row you want and make the condition correct.

You could also do this, which is easier to remember

SELECT *
FROM vwuser AS a
CROSS APPLY fnuserrank(a.userid)
) foo
join 
(
select empid, max(monitordate) maxdate
FROM vwuser AS b
CROSS APPLY fnuserrank(b.userid)
 where rank != 'TERM'
) bar
on foo.empid = bar.empid
and foo.monitordate = bar.maxdate

I usually prefer to use set based logic over aggregate functions, but whatever works. You can tweak it also by caching the results of your TVF join into a table variable.

EDIT: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/613e4/17 - I mocked up your TVF here. Apparently sqlfiddle didn't like "go".

select foo.*, bar.*
from 
(
SELECT f.*
FROM vwuser AS a
join fnuserrank f
  on a.empid = f.empid
where rank != 'TERM'
) foo
left join 
(
SELECT f1.empid [barempid], f1.monitordate [barmonitordate]
FROM vwuser AS b
join fnuserrank f1
  on b.empid = f1.empid
where rank != 'TERM'
) bar
on foo.empId = bar.barempid
  and foo.MonitorDate > bar.barmonitordate
where bar.barempid is  null  
share|improve this answer
    
BTW - you can you "GO" (all caps) in SQL Fiddle (for SQL Server queries) - sqlfiddle.com/#!3/0e45d/1 –  Jake Feasel Oct 22 '12 at 13:58
    
How odd that capitalization would matter for that. –  Brian White Oct 22 '12 at 17:37
    
Yeah, I could relax the case requirements, I suppose. Maybe I'll add that to my to-do list. My impression was that people always used GO in all caps, so it hasn't come up before. –  Jake Feasel Oct 22 '12 at 18:04
    
That requires pressing SHIFT. An entire extra key press! I'm way too lazy to do that :) Hey, big props for sqlfiddle! –  Brian White Oct 24 '12 at 1:14
    
Good news, Brian - as a result of our chat, I've fixed the code to no longer be case-sensitive. GO, Go, go, and gO - Thanks! –  Jake Feasel Oct 29 '12 at 4:37

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