Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to assign weightings to a randomly generated number, with the weightings represented below.

  0  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6
─────────────────────────────────────────
  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |  X
  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |   
  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |     |   
  X  |  X  |  X  |  X  |     |     |   
  X  |  X  |  X  |     |     |     |   
  X  |  X  |     |     |     |     |   
  X  |     |     |     |     |     |   

What's the most efficient way to do it?

share|improve this question
4  
If you move all the way to the right (i.e. to 6) no matter where you start, then 6 is always going to be visited, yes? Which means 6 will always be an outlier. Please clarify your question. –  aecolley Oct 21 '12 at 1:53
1  
the given distribution will be created if you always pick '0'... –  mfrankli Oct 21 '12 at 1:54
3  
alternatively, describe the actual problem you are trying to solve rather than a perceieved solution... –  Mitch Wheat Oct 21 '12 at 1:55
    
@aecolley You're right, I should have spotted that. Amended. –  Alec Oct 21 '12 at 1:57
    
I don't think what you're describing is possible. The only weight that would uniformly distribute visits is to always select '0'. When you select 0 you add 1 count to everything. If you select 0 N times and 5 1 time, then you get 0,1,2,3,4 -> N, and still visited 5 more often. –  FoolishSeth Oct 21 '12 at 2:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@Kerrek's answer is good.

But if the histogram of weights is not all small integers, you need something more powerful:

Divide [0..1] into intervals sized with the weights. Here you need segments with relative size ratios 7:6:5:4:3:2:1. So the size of one interval unit is 1/(7+6+5+4+3+2+1)=1/28, and the sizes of the intervals are 7/28, 6/28, ... 1/28.

These comprise a probability distribution because they sum to 1.

Now find the cumulative distribution:

P        x
7/28  => 0
13/28 => 1
18/28 => 2
22/28 => 3
25/28 => 4
27/28 => 5
28/28 => 6

Now generate a random r number in [0..1] and look it up in this table by finding the smallest x such that r <= P(x). This is the random value you want.

The table lookup can be done with binary search, which is a good idea when the histogram has many bins.

Note you are effectively constructing the inverse cumulative density function, so this is sometimes called the method of inverse transforms.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out it's the inverse cumulative density function, that led me to this people.sc.fsu.edu/~jburkardt/c_src/asa241/asa241.c source code which is I think what I'm going to use. –  Alec Oct 21 '12 at 2:59
    
Actually, what am I talking about, it just needs some integration. Something like 7x-(x^2)/2 = 6. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction though. –  Alec Oct 21 '12 at 3:08

If your array is small, just pick a uniform random index into the following array:

int a[] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 2,2,2,2,2, 3,3,3,3, 4,4,4, 5,5, 6};

If you want to generate the distribution at runtime, use std::discrete_distribution.

share|improve this answer
    
The array's large, and of a length only determined at runtime. –  Alec Oct 21 '12 at 2:09
    
@Alec: Added (though I'm not sure why you don't describe your constraints in the question). –  Kerrek SB Oct 21 '12 at 2:11

To get the distribution you want, first you basically add up the count of X's you wrote in there. You can do it like this (my C is super rusty, so treat this as pseudocode)

int num_cols = 7; // for your example
int max;
if (num_cols % 2 == 0) // even
{
    max = (num_cols+1) * (num_cols/2);
}
else // odd
{
    max = (num_cols+1) * (num_cols/2) + ((num_cols+1)/2);
}

Then you need to randomly select an integer between 1 and max inclusive.

So if your random integer is r the last step is to find which column holds the r'th X. Something like this should work:

for(int i=0;i<num_cols;i++)
{
    r -= (num_cols-i);
    if (r < 1) return i;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.